Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Fast-flying fungal spores
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
A Tongue and a Half
New Elephant-Shrew
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Birds
Flightless Birds
Swans
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
The metal detector in your mouth
The memory of a material
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
New eyes to scan the skies
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
A Dino King's Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
A Dire Shortage of Water
Deep Drilling at Sea
Environment
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Ready, unplug, drive
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
The Taming of the Cat
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Puffer Fish
Sturgeons
Manta Rays
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Strong Bones for Life
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math of the World
Human Body
Foul Play?
The tell-tale bacteria
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Flatworms
Camel Spiders
Scallops
Mammals
Boxers
Llamas
Elk
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Crocodilians
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Dancing with Robots
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
How to Fly Like a Bat
Middle school science adventures
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Catching Some Rays
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Insect Stowaways

To make this discovery, the scientists had to trudge through a wet salt marsh to dry places where the birds roost. They then had to pick up piles of bird droppings. Thousands of water birds called black-tailed godwits stop at the marsh in Spain every year as they trek from their northern breeding grounds to their winter homes in Africa. As they rest, they eat. After they eat, they poop. Scientists have long known that seeds can survive the strong digestive juices of an animal's stomach. Birds, rodents, and even people eat seeds in one place and plop them out in another. If conditions are just right, the seeds can then take root and grow into new plants. Scientists have also observed snails that hitchhike by sticking to ducks' feet and eggs of tiny brine shrimp and other water animals that survive in bird guts. In the godwit droppings, the researchers were amazed to find bright red larvae called bloodworms. These larvae grow up to be mosquito-like insects called midges. It was the first time that anyone had found living larvae hitchhiking inside the body of an animal. The researchers studied six sets of godwit droppings and found living larvae in three of the sets. In total, they came up with 95 larvae that were still in one piece. Of these, 12 were alive. They hadn't been harmed at all by the digestive systems of the birds. Bugs, guts, and poop are gross on their own. Add them together, and you've got what may be the ickiest news story of the year. Researchers in Spain have found a species of insect larvae that pass through the guts of migrating birds and emerge in the birds' droppings, unharmed. The larvae were probably able to survive the trip because birds don't fully digest their food when they eat a lot. And, when the birds migrate, they tend to gorge themselves frequently. Bloodworms take advantage of this to travel much farther than they could ever get on their own. Poop, it seems, can take you places.E. Sohn

Insect Stowaways
Insect Stowaways








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™