Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
Roach Love Songs
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Behavior
Bringing fish back up to size
Monkeys in the Mirror
The Electric Brain
Birds
Geese
A Meal Plan for Birds
Hawks
Chemistry and Materials
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Diamond Glow
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
The Book of Life
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
A Dino King's Ancestor
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
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Earth
Petrified Lightning
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Environment
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Skates
Manta Rays
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
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GSAT Mathematics
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Math of the World
Human Body
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
A Fix for Injured Knees
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Moths
Butterflies
Crawfish
Mammals
Little Brown Bats
Kangaroos
Wombats
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Road Bumps
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Assembling the Tree of Life
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Tortoises
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Dark Galaxy
Baby Star
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Weaving with Light
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Middle school science adventures
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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How children learn

Your child is an individual and different from all others. The way your child learns best depends on many factors: age; learning style, personality. Read the notes below, and think about your child. This will help you to choose activities and methods that will suit your child best.

Children pass through different stages of learning

A baby or infant learns about the world through reacting to input through the senses.
From about two until seven years old the child starts to develop the ability to reason and think, but is still self-centred.

After the age of about seven a child usually becomes less self-centred and can look outside themselves. By the age of 12 most children can reason and test out their ideas about the world.
This means that with younger children we need to personalise and give examples which relate to themselves, whereas older children need help to make sense of the world around them. This also means that children must be at the right stage ready to learn. For example younger children are ready to acquire the concepts of number, colour and shape but are not ready for abstract grammatical rules.

What kind of learner is your child?

It is important to understand how your child likes to learn best. Which are the child's dominant senses? Do they like pictures and reading? If so you can encourage your child to use drawings, pictures, maps or diagrams as part of their learning.

Some children like listening to explanations and reading aloud. You could use reading stories to encourage this kind of child. And most children enjoy learning through songs, chants and rhymes.
Does your child like to touch things and physically move about? Some children have tons of energy to burn off! You could play games to get them moving or running around, acting out rhymes or stories or even dancing!

Other quieter children may have a good vocabulary and be a good reader. Word games, crosswords, wordsearches, anagrams and tongue twisters would be good to encourage these children.
Yet other children require logical, clear explanations of rules and patterns, or like to work out the rules for themselves. They may be good at maths too. For these children activities such as word puzzles, reading and writing puzzles, problem-solving, putting things in order or categories and computer games provide ideal opportunities for learning.

What kind of interaction does your child prefer?

Some children are outgoing and sociable and can learn a language quickly because they want to communicate. They are not worried about making mistakes.

Other children are quieter and more reflective. They learn by listening and observing what is happening. They don't like to make mistakes and will hang back until they are sure.

If your child is outgoing they may do best learning in groups with other children, whereas a quieter child may need more private, quiet time to feel more secure about learning a language. You can provide this in many ways – even through the bedtime story in English.

Motivating your child

For a child to be motivated learning needs to be fun and stress-free. Encourage them to follow their own interests and personal likes. For example if your child likes football he or she will probably like to read a story about football even if the level is a little difficult. Interest and motivation often allows children to cope with more difficult language.
Try to provide as many fun activities as you can for learning English. Songs and music, videos and DVDs, any kind of game especially computer games are motivating for all children.

For how long can your child concentrate?

Children can usually only concentrate for short periods of time – when you are doing an activity with your child, using flashcards for example, or doing a worksheet, make sure that you stop or change activity when your child is bored or restless. This might be after only a few minutes.
Correcting your child's mistakes

Children respond well to praise and encouragement – let your child know when they have done something well. Don't criticise them too much when they make a mistake. It's natural to make mistakes when learning a language. Don't pick up on every grammatical mistake – encourage your child to use English to communicate.
Repetition and routines

Children need to repeat language items many times to get them to ‘stick’ so don't be afraid to repeat games or do several different activities with the same language topic or set of words. Children often love to repeat the same song or story as it gives them a sense of confidence and familiarity.
Establishing a regular routine for homework is also important. You can check what they have to do for homework and set up a regular time for doing it.

How children learn









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