Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Silk’s superpowers
Springing forward
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
Chicken Talk
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Behavior
The nerve of one animal
Math is a real brain bender
Mosquito duets
Birds
Cranes
Vultures
Mockingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Revving Up Green Machines
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Computers
Middle school science adventures
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Middle school science adventures
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Snow Traps
Missing Tigers in India
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Angler Fish
Electric Ray
Eels
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Prime Time for Cicadas
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Flatworms
Beetles
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Mongooses
Hamsters
Spectacled Bear
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Black Hole Journey
IceCube Science
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Assembling the Tree of Life
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Anacondas
Pythons
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Sounds of Titan
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Catching a Comet's Tail
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Supersuits for Superheroes
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Robots on a Rocky Road
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Watering the Air
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Homework blues

Homework can put you in a bad mood, and that might actually be a good thing. New research suggests that, in some cases, being too happy can hurt your performance on certain kinds of tasks. Researchers from the University of Plymouth in England wondered whether mood might affect the way kids learn. To find out, they performed two learning experiments with children. The first experiment enlisted 30 kids, ages 10 and 11. Each child was given 20 problems in which a triangle or houselike shape was hidden inside a different, larger image. The kids had to find the small shape while sitting in a room with either upbeat or gloomy classical music playing in the background. As a measure of mood, the scientists asked the kids to point to one of five faces, ranging from happy to sad. Children listening to the upbeat music tended to point to the smiley faces, indicating that they felt happy. Kids surrounded by gloomy tunes pointed instead to the frowns. The researchers found that sad kids took at least a second less to find the small shapes. The gloomy kids also correctly identified an average of three or four more shapes. In the second experiment, 61 children, ages 6 and 7, faced the same type of shape-finding problems. Instead of listening to different types of music, though, they watched one of three scenes from an animated film. One scene was happy. One was neutral. One was sad. In this study, kids’ moods tended to reflect the scene they had seen.. And just like in the first experiment, kids who felt sad or neutral performed better on the tests compared to happier kids. They solved an average of two or three more problems. The researchers hypothesize that feeling down makes people more aware of details, perhaps because sadness makes us more likely to focus on a problem or difficult situation. Some studies suggest that mildly sad adults do better than happy ones on tests of memory, judgment and persuasive argument that involve attention to detail. Not all scientists agree with these conclusions, however. Other studies suggest that people who feel happy are better able to switch between focusing on details and focusing on the big picture. And the new studies have flaws, critics say. It’s possible, for example, that lively music in the first experiment distracted kids from finding shapes. While scientists work on sorting out the answers, it still might be worth tailoring your tasks to your mood. After eating a yummy bowl of ice cream, for instance, write an essay. Save the math problems for after you’ve been told you can’t have seconds.

Homework blues
Homework blues








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™