Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
Feeding School for Meerkats
Awake at Night
Insect Stowaways
Behavior
Mosquito duets
Girls are cool for school
Between a rock and a wet place
Birds
Turkeys
Cassowaries
Kiwis
Chemistry and Materials
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Music of the Future
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
Hall of Dinos
Have shell, will travel
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
A Dire Shortage of Water
Environment
Plastic Meals for Seals
Inspired by Nature
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Angler Fish
Basking Sharks
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
A Taste for Cheese
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Running with Sneaker Science
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Caterpillars
Moths
Insects
Mammals
Dogs
Little Brown Bats
Coyotes
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Project Music
The Particle Zoo
IceCube Science
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Flower family knows its roots
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Pythons
Copperhead Snakes
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
Melting Snow on Mars
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Crime Lab
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Where rivers run uphill
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Homework blues

Homework can put you in a bad mood, and that might actually be a good thing. New research suggests that, in some cases, being too happy can hurt your performance on certain kinds of tasks. Researchers from the University of Plymouth in England wondered whether mood might affect the way kids learn. To find out, they performed two learning experiments with children. The first experiment enlisted 30 kids, ages 10 and 11. Each child was given 20 problems in which a triangle or houselike shape was hidden inside a different, larger image. The kids had to find the small shape while sitting in a room with either upbeat or gloomy classical music playing in the background. As a measure of mood, the scientists asked the kids to point to one of five faces, ranging from happy to sad. Children listening to the upbeat music tended to point to the smiley faces, indicating that they felt happy. Kids surrounded by gloomy tunes pointed instead to the frowns. The researchers found that sad kids took at least a second less to find the small shapes. The gloomy kids also correctly identified an average of three or four more shapes. In the second experiment, 61 children, ages 6 and 7, faced the same type of shape-finding problems. Instead of listening to different types of music, though, they watched one of three scenes from an animated film. One scene was happy. One was neutral. One was sad. In this study, kidsí moods tended to reflect the scene they had seen.. And just like in the first experiment, kids who felt sad or neutral performed better on the tests compared to happier kids. They solved an average of two or three more problems. The researchers hypothesize that feeling down makes people more aware of details, perhaps because sadness makes us more likely to focus on a problem or difficult situation. Some studies suggest that mildly sad adults do better than happy ones on tests of memory, judgment and persuasive argument that involve attention to detail. Not all scientists agree with these conclusions, however. Other studies suggest that people who feel happy are better able to switch between focusing on details and focusing on the big picture. And the new studies have flaws, critics say. Itís possible, for example, that lively music in the first experiment distracted kids from finding shapes. While scientists work on sorting out the answers, it still might be worth tailoring your tasks to your mood. After eating a yummy bowl of ice cream, for instance, write an essay. Save the math problems for after youíve been told you canít have seconds.

Homework blues
Homework blues








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