Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Salamanders
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Polar Bears in Trouble
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Jay Watch
Behavior
A brain-boosting video game
Taking a Spill for Science
Fear Matters
Birds
Rheas
Peafowl
Blue Jays
Chemistry and Materials
Earth from the inside out
The memory of a material
Heaviest named element is official
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Batteries built by Viruses
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
Digging for Ancient DNA
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Life under Ice
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Environment
Out in the Cold
Shrimpy Invaders
Improving the Camel
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Untangling Human Origins
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Flounder
White Tip Sharks
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
The Color of Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
A Better Flu Shot
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Ticks
Black Widow spiders
Centipedes
Mammals
Hoofed Mammals
Wombats
Deers
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Powering Ball Lightning
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Flower family knows its roots
Springing forward
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Boa Constrictors
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
A Moon's Icy Spray
Catching a Comet's Tail
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Musclebots Take Some Steps
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Flying the Hyper Skies
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Heavy Sleep

Weighing too much can damage your health, and obesity is a growing problem for both kids and adults around the world. Sleep might be one answer to the problem. A new study has found that elementary school students who slept too little were more likely to gain pounds. Past studies have shown a link between sleeping less and weighing more, but scientists have had a tough time determining "which came first, the chicken or the egg," says Julie C. Lumeng of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. In other words, it hasn't been clear whether kids who weigh too much have trouble sleeping, or whether sleeping less leads to weight gain. Both scenarios seemed equally possible. To get a better idea of which causes which, Lumeng and colleagues interviewed the parents of 785 third graders from around the United States. The parents answered questions about how well their kids slept that year. Three years later, the parents answered the same questions. By sixth grade, 18 percent of kids involved in the study were obese. The scientists found no relationship between weight and the students' race or gender. It also didn't matter how strict their parents were, or whether they were boys or girls. Obesity struck all of these groups equally. Instead, sleep seemed to be the key factor. Over the 3 years of the study, the children averaged a healthy 9.5 hours of sleep a night. Some kids, however, slept a lot more--or less--than others. For the sixth graders, every hour of sleep above the 9.5-hour average was linked to a 20 percent lower risk of being obese. Sleep appeared doubly important for the third graders. Every extra hour of sleep they got was linked to a 40 percent drop in obesity by sixth grade. "I expected we'd find that this [sleep link with obesity] was just a bunch of bunk," says Lumeng, a pediatrician. But their findings were convincing. No matter how her team looked at the link, "we couldn't make it go away."—Emily Sohn

Heavy Sleep
Heavy Sleep








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™