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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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A Jellyfish's Blurry View
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math is a real brain bender
Play for Science
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A Better Flu Shot
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Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
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The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Powering Ball Lightning
Electric Backpack
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Getting the dirt on carbon
A Change in Leaf Color
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
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Black Holes That Burp
Return to Space
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Toy Challenge
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
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Countable and Uncountable Nouns
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Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Robots on a Rocky Road
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
A Change in Climate
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Arctic Melt
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Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. It's a medical first, and the technique may eventually allow doctors to make new hearts from patients' own cells. This should largely avoid the risk that the patient's body will reject the new heart, which often happens today. Researchers from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis started with hearts from rats that had been dead for less than 18 hours. Led by Doris A. Taylor, the scientists put the hearts in glass beakers and used a liquid detergent to wash away the dead cells. Left behind was a heart-shaped mass of proteins that normally surround heart cells and hold them together. The mass was translucent, which means it lets light through, and it had the consistency of Jell-O. Next, Taylor and her colleagues took cells from hearts of newborn rats. They injected these living cells into the hollowed-out hearts. Eight days later, the hearts were pumping weakly. And the injected cells in each heart beat synchronously—that is, all at the same time. "The fact that we can get these cells to beat synchronously is incredibly encouraging," Taylor says. It will be years before doctors might consider using this method to repair hearts in people, the scientists warn. In the study, the rebuilt hearts could pump blood only about 2 percent as fast as a normal adult rat heart can. Eventually, scientists would like to be able to use primitive stem cells from a patient's blood or heart tissue to repair his or her own organs.—Emily Sohn

Heart Revival
Heart Revival








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