Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Animals
The Littlest Lemurs
Life on the Down Low
New Mammals
Behavior
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Lightening Your Mood
Listening to Birdsong
Birds
Doves
Eagles
Dodos
Chemistry and Materials
Atom Hauler
The chemistry of sleeplessness
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
Play for Science
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Downsized Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Dig
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Recipe for a Hurricane
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Saving Wetlands
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Bull Sharks
Electric Eel
Seahorses
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The Color of Health
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Running with Sneaker Science
Taste Messenger
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Jellyfish
Worms
Termites
Mammals
Goats
African Hyenas
Bonobos
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Speedy stars
Dreams of Floating in Space
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Geckos
Lizards
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Ringing Saturn
Return to Space
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Middle school science adventures
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Watering the Air
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. It's a medical first, and the technique may eventually allow doctors to make new hearts from patients' own cells. This should largely avoid the risk that the patient's body will reject the new heart, which often happens today. Researchers from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis started with hearts from rats that had been dead for less than 18 hours. Led by Doris A. Taylor, the scientists put the hearts in glass beakers and used a liquid detergent to wash away the dead cells. Left behind was a heart-shaped mass of proteins that normally surround heart cells and hold them together. The mass was translucent, which means it lets light through, and it had the consistency of Jell-O. Next, Taylor and her colleagues took cells from hearts of newborn rats. They injected these living cells into the hollowed-out hearts. Eight days later, the hearts were pumping weakly. And the injected cells in each heart beat synchronously—that is, all at the same time. "The fact that we can get these cells to beat synchronously is incredibly encouraging," Taylor says. It will be years before doctors might consider using this method to repair hearts in people, the scientists warn. In the study, the rebuilt hearts could pump blood only about 2 percent as fast as a normal adult rat heart can. Eventually, scientists would like to be able to use primitive stem cells from a patient's blood or heart tissue to repair his or her own organs.—Emily Sohn

Heart Revival
Heart Revival








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