Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
The History of Meow
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Firefly Delight
Behavior
The nerve of one animal
Double take
Puberty gone wild
Birds
Songbirds
Hawks
Dodos
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
Heaviest named element is official
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Earth from the inside out
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Feathered Fossils
Meet your mysterious relative
Have shell, will travel
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
A Great Quake Coming?
Riding to Earth's Core
Environment
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Ready, unplug, drive
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Piranha
Mahi-Mahi
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math of the World
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
Hear, Hear
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Moths
Snails
Clams
Mammals
Wildcats
Domestic Shorthairs
Cats
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
The Particle Zoo
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Tortoises
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
An Earthlike Planet
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Bionic Bacteria
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Flying the Hyper Skies
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Watering the Air
A Change in Climate
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Galaxies on the go

Scientists have a mystery of cosmic proportions on their hands. Recently astronomers noticed something strange. It seems that millions of stars are racing at high speeds toward a single spot in the sky. Huge collections of stars, gas and dust are called galaxies. Some galaxies congregate into groups of hundreds or thousands, called galaxy clusters. These clusters can be observed by the X-rays they give off. Scientists are excited about the racing clusters because the cause of their movement can't be explained by any known means. The discovery came about when scientists studied a group of 700 racing clusters. These clusters were carefully mapped in the early 1990s using data collected by an orbiting telescope. The telescope recorded X-rays created by electrons located in the hot core of a galaxy cluster. The researchers then looked at the same 700 clusters on a map of whatís called the cosmic microwave background, or CMB. The CMB is radiation, a form of energy, leftover from the Big Bang. Scientists believe that the Big Bang marks the beginning of the universe, billions of years ago. The CMB provides a picture of how the early universe looked soon after the Big Bang. By comparing information from the CMB to the map of galaxy clusters, scientists could measure the movement of the clusters. This is possible because a clusterís movement causes a change in how bright the CMB appears. As a galaxy cluster moves across the sky, the electrons from its hot core interact with radiation from the CMB. This interaction creates a change in the radiationís frequency, or how often an event occurs in a certain amount of time. Scientists can then measure the frequencies to detect movement. As a galaxy cluster moves toward Earth, the radiation frequency goes up. As a cluster moves away from Earth, the frequency goes down. This shift in the frequencies creates an effect similar to the Doppler effect. The Doppler effect is commonly used to measure the speed of moving objects, such as cars. Scientists can use this method to measure the speed and direction of moving galaxies by looking at changes in the radiation frequencies. What the scientists found surprised them. Though the frequency shifts were small, the clusters were moving across the sky at a high speed ó about 1,000 kilometers per second. Even more surprising, the clusters were all moving in the same direction toward a single point in the sky. Researchers donít know whatís pulling this matter across the sky, but they are calling the source ďdark flow.Ē Whatever it is, scientists say the source likely lies outside the visible universe. That means it canít be detected by ordinary means, such as telescopes. One thing is certain. Dark flow has shown that we donít understand everything we see in the universe and that there are still discoveries to be made.

Galaxies on the go
Galaxies on the go








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™