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Where Have All the Bees Gone?
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Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
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March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
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Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
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Spin, Splat, and Scramble
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The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
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Cactus Goo for Clean Water
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Cousin Earth
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
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Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Supersuits for Superheroes
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The Parts of Speech
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Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
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Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Watering the Air
A Change in Climate
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From Chimps to People

It can be fascinating to watch chimpanzees at the zoo. Chimps are the closest, living animal relatives to people. Watching them can be like watching ourselves. To figure out just how similar people and chimps are, scientists have been studying DNA—material in every cell that makes up genes and determines much of what we look like and who we are. Recently, an international group of researchers compared the entire genome (or set of DNA) of a male chimp to DNA data from people. The results show that people and chimpanzees are indeed very similar, but we might be more different genetically than scientists previously thought. DNA is made up of units called nucleotides. The sequence of nucleotides, also called base pairs, determines what genes do. The new study found that 3 billion of these base pairs have the same pattern in people and chimps 96 percent of the time. That might sound like we have a lot in common. There are, however, as many as 3 million important base pairs that are different. The scientists found six segments of DNA that seem to have changed a lot in people over the last 250,000 years. There was also a lot of variety at the ends of long stretches of DNA called chromosomes. Other results show that chimpanzees have major mutations (nucleotide changes) on their Y chromosomes (which only males have), but human males don't have the same mutations. And genes that are active in the brain have more mutations in people than in chimps. Scientists don't yet know what all of these differences mean. The more they learn, the more we'll understand about the ancestors that we share with our ape cousins. Now, that's something to think about the next time you eat a banana!—E. Sohn

From Chimps to People
From Chimps to People








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