Agriculture
Springing forward
Middle school science adventures
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
Behavior
The case of the headless ant
Double take
The (kids') eyes have it
Birds
Crows
Waterfowl
Storks
Chemistry and Materials
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Moon Crash, Splash
Computers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A Light Delay
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Dinosaurs Grow Up
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
An Ocean View's Downside
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Snow Traps
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
The Taming of the Cat
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Tuna
Perches
Puffer Fish
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Problems with Prepositions
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
A Long Haul
Electricity's Spark of Life
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Scorpions
Flatworms
Bedbugs
Mammals
Echidnas
Rodents
Moose
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Nature's Alphabet
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Tortoises
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
A Light Delay
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Earth's Poles in Peril
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Flying the Hyper Skies

A little airplane has given new meaning to the term "going hyper." The Hyper-X recently broke the record for air-breathing jet planes when it traveled at a hypersonic speed of seven times the speed of sound. That's about 5,000 miles per hour. At this speed, you'd get around the world—flying along the equator—in less than 5 hours. The Hyper-X is an unmanned, experimental aircraft just 12 feet long. It achieves hypersonic speed using a special sort of engine known as a scramjet. It may sound like something from a comic book, but engineers have been experimenting with scramjets since the 1960s. For an engine to burn fuel and produce energy, it needs oxygen. A jet engine, like those on passenger airplanes, gets oxygen from the air. A rocket engine typically goes faster but has to carry its own supply of oxygen. A scramjet engine goes as fast as a rocket, but it doesn't have to carry its own oxygen supply. A scramjet's special design allows it to extract oxygen from the air that flows through the engine. And it does so without letting the fast-moving air put out the combustion flames. However, a scramjet engine works properly only at speeds greater than five times the speed of sound. A booster rocket carried the Hyper-X to an altitude of about 100,000 feet for its test flight. The aircraft's record-beating flight lasted just 11 seconds. In the future, engineers predict, airplanes equipped with scramjet engines could transport cargo quickly and cheaply to the brink of space. Hypersonic airliners could carry passengers anywhere in the world in just a few hours. Out of the three experimental Hyper-X aircraft built for NASA, only one is now left. The agency has plans for another, 11-second hypersonic flight, this time at 10 times the speed of sound. Hang on tight!—S. McDonagh

Flying the Hyper Skies
Flying the Hyper Skies








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