Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Watching out for vultures
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Red Apes in Danger
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Behavior
Brainy bees know two from three
The (kids') eyes have it
Seeing red means danger ahead
Birds
Birds We Eat
Geese
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Screaming for Ice Cream
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Sticky Silky Feet
Computers
Troubles with Hubble
Galaxies on the go
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Environment
Saving Wetlands
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
If Only Bones Could Speak
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Whale Sharks
Basking Sharks
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Deep-space dancers
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Worms
Tapeworms
Daddy Long Legs
Mammals
Beavers
Bears
Raccoons
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
IceCube Science
Extra Strings for New Sounds
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Assembling the Tree of Life
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Chameleons
Turtles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
Planning for Mars
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Machine Copy
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Arctic Melt
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Flying the Hyper Skies

A little airplane has given new meaning to the term "going hyper." The Hyper-X recently broke the record for air-breathing jet planes when it traveled at a hypersonic speed of seven times the speed of sound. That's about 5,000 miles per hour. At this speed, you'd get around the world—flying along the equator—in less than 5 hours. The Hyper-X is an unmanned, experimental aircraft just 12 feet long. It achieves hypersonic speed using a special sort of engine known as a scramjet. It may sound like something from a comic book, but engineers have been experimenting with scramjets since the 1960s. For an engine to burn fuel and produce energy, it needs oxygen. A jet engine, like those on passenger airplanes, gets oxygen from the air. A rocket engine typically goes faster but has to carry its own supply of oxygen. A scramjet engine goes as fast as a rocket, but it doesn't have to carry its own oxygen supply. A scramjet's special design allows it to extract oxygen from the air that flows through the engine. And it does so without letting the fast-moving air put out the combustion flames. However, a scramjet engine works properly only at speeds greater than five times the speed of sound. A booster rocket carried the Hyper-X to an altitude of about 100,000 feet for its test flight. The aircraft's record-beating flight lasted just 11 seconds. In the future, engineers predict, airplanes equipped with scramjet engines could transport cargo quickly and cheaply to the brink of space. Hypersonic airliners could carry passengers anywhere in the world in just a few hours. Out of the three experimental Hyper-X aircraft built for NASA, only one is now left. The agency has plans for another, 11-second hypersonic flight, this time at 10 times the speed of sound. Hang on tight!—S. McDonagh

Flying the Hyper Skies
Flying the Hyper Skies








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