Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Crocodile Hearts
Monkeys Count
Cool Penguins
Behavior
Math Naturals
Between a rock and a wet place
A Recipe for Happiness
Birds
Storks
Ospreys
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
Silk’s superpowers
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Look into My Eyes
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
A Dino King's Ancestor
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Catching Some Rays
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Salt and Early Civilization
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Manta Rays
Perches
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. Whom
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Gut Microbes and Weight
Flu Patrol
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Sea Anemones
Millipedes
Mammals
Rabbits
Chimpanzees
Cocker Spaniels
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
IceCube Science
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
One ring around them all
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Turtles
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Algae Motors
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Reach for the Sky
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
A Change in Climate
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Flightless Birds

Birds may be best identified for their ability to fly, but not all species have that advantage. Several birds -- from New Zealand's kiwi to the great African ostrich -- have evolved wings or grown to a size which prevent them from taking flight. Where they cannot get airborn, like other birds, they have adapted other important skills: some can run much faster than flying birds, and others have become impressive swimmers. Whatever the reason for their evolution, none of them seems to mind being stuck on the ground. Not all species of birds are capable of flying. The best known flightless birds are the ostrich, emu, cassowary, rhea and penguin. Flightless birds evolved from flying ancestors; there are about forty species in existence today. They lost the power of flight because they had few enemies. Most flightless birds evolved in the absence of predators, on islands. A notable exception, the ostrich, which lives in the African savannas, has claws on its feet/birds to use as a weapon against predators. Two key differences between flying and flightless birds are the smaller wing bones of flightless birds and the absent (or greatly reduced) keel on their breastbone. The keel anchors muscles needed for wing movement[1]. Flightless birds also have more feathers than flying birds. New Zealand has more species of flightless birds (including the kiwi, penguin, and takahe) than any other country. One reason is that until the arrival of humans roughly 1000 years ago, there were no land mammals in New Zealand other than three species of bat; the main predators of flightless birds were larger birds[2]. With the introduction of mammals (among them humans) to the habitats of flightless birds, many have become extinct, including the Great Auk, the Dodo, and the Moa. The smallest flightless bird is the Inaccessible Island Rail (12.5 cm and 34.7 g). The largest - heaviest and tallest - flightless bird (and, incidentally, the largest living bird) is the ostrich (2.7 m and 156 kg)[3]. Flightless birds are the easiest to take care of in captivity because they do not have to be kept in cages. Ostriches used to be farmed for their decorative feathers. Today they are raised for their skins. Their skins are used to make leather.

Flightless Birds
Flightless Birds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™