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Watering the Air
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Toads
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Vent Worms Like It Hot
Life on the Down Low
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
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Swine flu goes global
The Smell of Trust
Video Game Violence
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A Meal Plan for Birds
Lovebirds
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Chemistry and Materials
Moon Crash, Splash
Supergoo to the rescue
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
Look into My Eyes
The solar system's biggest junkyard
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
A Dino King's Ancestor
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Earth
Ancient Heights
Weird, new ant
Earth's Poles in Peril
Environment
Giant snakes invading North America
What is groundwater
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Decoding a Beverage Jar
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Fish
Puffer Fish
Skates
Bass
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Chocolate Rules
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
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Setting a Prime Number Record
Monkeys Count
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Human Body
A New Touch
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Clams
Corals
Mollusks
Mammals
Siamese Cats
Miscellaneous Mammals
Marsupials
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Flower family knows its roots
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Komodo Dragons
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
A Change in Climate
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Flies

As defined by entomologists (scientists who study insects), a fly is any species of insect of the order Diptera. These typically have one pair of true wings, with a set of modified hind wings. Flies are common amongst humans and some can cause the spread of serious diseases. The house fly and mosquito are particularly common amongst humans. Other flies, such as the horse fly, can inflict painful bites. The larva of a fly is commonly called a maggot. Flies rely heavily on sight for survival. The compound eyes of flies are composed of thousands of individual lenses and are very sensitive to movement. Some flies have very accurate 3D vision. A few, like Ormia ochracea, have very advanced hearing organs. The diet of flies varies heavily between species. The horse fly eats bits of flesh torn off of its prey, mosquitoes feed on blood and nectar, and the house fly eats a semi-digested liquid created by mixing-enzyme rich saliva with its food. In addition to being an essential part of the food chain, some species of flies spread pollen, hasten the decomposition of plants, animals, and dung, and, in the case of about 5000 species of Tachina flies, eat other insects. The fly life cycle is composed of four stages: egg, larva (commonly known as a maggot), pupa, adult. The eggs are laid in decaying flesh, animal dung, manure, or pools of stagnant water - whatever has ample food for the larva. Some types of maggots found on corpses can be of great use to forensic scientists. By their stage of development, these maggots can be used to give an indication of the time elapsed since death, as well as the place the organism died. Various maggots cause damage in agricultural crop production, including root maggots in rapeseed and midge maggots in wheat. Some maggots are leaf miners. Maggots are bred commercially, as a popular bait in angling, and a food for carnivourous pets such as reptiles or birds. Due to the increasing popularity of maggots, a maggot vending machine has been installed in the English county town of Northampton. Through the ages maggots have also been used in medicine in order to clean out necrotic wounds; maggots, applied to an open wound, will quickly eat the dead or necrotic parts of the wound, essentially "cleaning it" of all dead tissue. Once the dead tissue has been properly cleaned the maggots are removed, and the wound can be safely closed.

Flies
Flies








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