Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Fishing for Giant Squid
The Littlest Lemurs
Blotchy Face, Big-Time Wasp
Behavior
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
The case of the headless ant
A brain-boosting video game
Birds
Swans
Crows
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
When frog gender flips
Atom Hauler
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Battling Mastodons
Fingerprinting Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Coral Gardens
Riding to Earth's Core
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Plastic Meals for Seals
To Catch a Dragonfly
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Carp
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Swordfish
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
A Taste for Cheese
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Detecting True Art
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Heavy Sleep
Sun Screen
Invertebrates
Octopuses
Crawfish
Jellyfish
Mammals
Elephants
Squirrels
Blue Whales
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Getting the dirt on carbon
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Asp
Snapping Turtles
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
A Satellite of Your Own
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
A Change in Climate
Watering the Air
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Flies

As defined by entomologists (scientists who study insects), a fly is any species of insect of the order Diptera. These typically have one pair of true wings, with a set of modified hind wings. Flies are common amongst humans and some can cause the spread of serious diseases. The house fly and mosquito are particularly common amongst humans. Other flies, such as the horse fly, can inflict painful bites. The larva of a fly is commonly called a maggot. Flies rely heavily on sight for survival. The compound eyes of flies are composed of thousands of individual lenses and are very sensitive to movement. Some flies have very accurate 3D vision. A few, like Ormia ochracea, have very advanced hearing organs. The diet of flies varies heavily between species. The horse fly eats bits of flesh torn off of its prey, mosquitoes feed on blood and nectar, and the house fly eats a semi-digested liquid created by mixing-enzyme rich saliva with its food. In addition to being an essential part of the food chain, some species of flies spread pollen, hasten the decomposition of plants, animals, and dung, and, in the case of about 5000 species of Tachina flies, eat other insects. The fly life cycle is composed of four stages: egg, larva (commonly known as a maggot), pupa, adult. The eggs are laid in decaying flesh, animal dung, manure, or pools of stagnant water - whatever has ample food for the larva. Some types of maggots found on corpses can be of great use to forensic scientists. By their stage of development, these maggots can be used to give an indication of the time elapsed since death, as well as the place the organism died. Various maggots cause damage in agricultural crop production, including root maggots in rapeseed and midge maggots in wheat. Some maggots are leaf miners. Maggots are bred commercially, as a popular bait in angling, and a food for carnivourous pets such as reptiles or birds. Due to the increasing popularity of maggots, a maggot vending machine has been installed in the English county town of Northampton. Through the ages maggots have also been used in medicine in order to clean out necrotic wounds; maggots, applied to an open wound, will quickly eat the dead or necrotic parts of the wound, essentially "cleaning it" of all dead tissue. Once the dead tissue has been properly cleaned the maggots are removed, and the wound can be safely closed.

Flies
Flies








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™