Agriculture
Watering the Air
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Newts
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
From Chimps to People
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Behavior
The Science Fair Circuit
Reading Body Language
Making light of sleep
Birds
Hawks
Flamingos
Storks
Chemistry and Materials
Supergoo to the rescue
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
The memory of a material
Computers
Middle school science adventures
Fingerprint Evidence
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
A Big, Weird Dino
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Earth
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Weird, new ant
Unnatural Disasters
Environment
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Shrimpy Invaders
Catching Some Rays
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
Ancient Cave Behavior
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Manta Rays
Freshwater Fish
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Food for Life
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
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GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Detecting True Art
Math Naturals
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Germ Zapper
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Fleas
Tarantula
Butterflies
Mammals
Marsupials
Walrus
Vampire Bats
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Project Music
Electric Backpack
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Anacondas
Sea Turtles
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Ready, unplug, drive
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Earth's Poles in Peril
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Fleas

Flea is the common name for any of the small wingless insects of the order Siphonaptera. Fleas are external parasites, living off the blood of mammals and birds. Itch causing critters: In most cases, fleas are just a nuisance to their hosts, but some people and some animals suffer allergic reactions to flea saliva resulting in rashes. Flea bites generally result in the formation of a slightly raised, swollen, itching spot with a single puncture point at the center. Fleas can also lead to hair loss as a result of frequent scratching and biting by the animal, and can cause anemia in extreme cases. Spreaders... of disease: However, fleas can also act as a vector for disease. One possible example of this was the bubonic plague, which may have been transmitted between rodents and humans. Murine typhus (endemic typhus) fever, and in some cases tapeworms can also be transmitted by fleas. Fleas pass through a complete life cycle consisting of egg, larva, pupa and adult. Completion of the life cycle from egg to adult varies from two weeks to eight months depending on the temperature, humidity, food, and species. Normally after a blood meal, the female flea lays about 15 to 20 eggs per day up to 600 in its lifetime usually on the host (dogs, cats, rats, rabbits, mice, squirrels, chipmunks, raccoons, opossums, foxes, chickens, humans, etc.). Eggs loosely laid in the hair coat drop out almost anywhere, especially where the host rests, sleeps or nests (rugs, carpets, upholstered furniture, cat or dog boxes, kennels, sand boxes, etc.). Eggs hatch between two days to two weeks into larvae found indoors in and along floor cracks, crevices, along baseboards, under rug edges and in furniture or beds. Outdoor development occurs in sandy gravel soils (moist sand boxes, dirt crawlspace under the house, under shrubs, etc.) where the host may rest or sleep. Sand and gravel are very suitable for larval development which is the reason fleas are erroneously called "sand fleas." Larvae are blind, avoid light, pass through three larval instars and take a week to several months to develop. Their food consists of digested blood from adult flea feces, dead skin, hair, feathers, and other organic debris; larvae do not suck blood. Pupae mature to adulthood within a silken cocoon woven by the larva to which pet hair, carpet fiber, dust, grass cuttings, and other debris adheres. In about five to fourteen days, adult fleas emerge or may remain resting in the cocoon until the detection of vibration (pet and people movement), pressure (host animal lying down on them), heat, noise, or carbon dioxide (meaning a potential blood source is near). Most fleas overwinter in the larval or pupal stage with survival and growth best during warm, moist winters and spring. "Flea season" is traditionally at the end of summer and in the early fall, but in warmer areas can last year round.

Fleas
Fleas








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