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Vent Worms Like It Hot
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Honeybees do the wave
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Talking with Hands
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Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Small but WISE
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Hubble trouble doubled
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A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
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The Oily Gulf
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Settling the Americas
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Goldfish
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How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Hey batter, wake up!
A Long Trek to Asia
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Invertebrates
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Manxes
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Bison
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The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
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Dreams of Floating in Space
Gaining a Swift Lift
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Fast-flying fungal spores
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Asp
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A Moon's Icy Spray
A Planet from the Early Universe
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Algae Motors
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Arctic Melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Finding Subjects and Verbs

NOTE: We will use the convention of a thin underline for subjects and a thick underline for verbs.

Being able to find the right subject and verb will help you correct errors of agreement.

Example:
The list of items is/are on the desk.

Being able to identify the subject and verb correctly will also help you with commas and semicolons as you will see later.

Definition:

A verb is a word that shows action (runs, hits, slides) or state of being (is, are, was, were, am,and so on).

Examples:
He ran around the block. 
You are my friend.

Rule 1

If a verb follows to, it is called an infinitive phrase and is not the main verb. You will find the main verb either before or after the infinitive phrase.

Examples:
I like to walk.
The efforts to get her elected succeeded.

Definition:

A subject is the noun or pronoun that performs the verb.

Example:
The woman hurried.
Woman is the subject.

Rule 2

A subject will come before a phrase beginning with of.

Example:
A bouquet of yellow roses will lend color and fragrance to the room.

Rule 3

To find the subject and verb, always find the verb first. Then ask who or what performed the verb.

Examples:
The jet engine passed inspection. 
Passed is the verb. Who or what passed? The engine, so engine is the subject. If you included the word jet as the subject, lightning will not strike you. Technically, jet is an adjective here and is part of what is known as the complete subject.

From the ceiling hung the chandelier. 
The verb is hung. Now, if you think ceiling is the subject, slow down. Ask who or what hung. The answer is chandelier, not ceiling. Therefore, chandelier is the subject.

Rule 4

Any request or command such as "Stop!" or "Walk quickly." has the understood subject youbecause if we ask who is to stop or walk quickly, the answer must be you.

Example:
(You) Please bring me some coffee.
Bring is the verb. Who is to do the bringing? You understood.

Rule 5

Sentences often have more than one subject, more than one verb, or pairs of subjects and verbs.

Examples:
I like cake and he likes ice cream.
Two pairs of subjects and verbs
He and I like cake.
Two subjects and one verb
She lifts weights and jogs daily.
One subject and two verbs

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Finding Subjects and Verbs









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