Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Return of the Lost Limbs
Life on the Down Low
Behavior
Pondering the puzzling platypus
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Pain Expectations
Birds
Cranes
Roadrunners
Eagles
Chemistry and Materials
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Sugary Survival Skill
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
The science of disappearing
Hubble trouble doubled
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
An Ancient Spider's Web
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Bugs with Gas
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Spotty Survival
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Tuna
Puffer Fish
Sturgeons
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
A Taste for Cheese
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Prime Time for Cicadas
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Hear, Hear
Cell Phone Tattlers
Invertebrates
Spiders
Clams
Leeches
Mammals
Marmots
Rabbits
Flying Foxes
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Flower family knows its roots
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Tortoises
Reptiles
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
A Smashing Display
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Shape Shifting
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Extra Strings for New Sounds

You've heard of pianos, violins, and guitars. Now, make room for the tritare (rhymes with guitar). Canadian mathematicians have invented the new music-making device by tweaking the standard concept of a stringed instrument. Instead of having strings that stretch between two points, the tritare has strings that are attached to the instrument at more than two points. Picture, for example, a Y-shaped string, anchored at its three endpoints. When played, the instrument produces an eerie sound that challenges the ears with complicated echoes and vibrations. The tritare looks like a guitar with two extra necks. One of the necks has thin crossbars, or frets, that mark places where pushing on strings creates desired pitches. The other two necks are unfretted. Plucking, strumming, or bowing a normal guitar string creates mathematically related sounds called harmonic overtones. For the most part, a string vibrates at a specific, standard rate (or frequency), say 440 times per second, which is the note A. But it also vibrates at twice that rate, creating a sound called the second harmonic. The string's vibration at three times the basic rate is called the third harmonic, and so on. Playing the tritare generates harmonic overtones, but it also creates sounds that are nonharmonic. Nonharmonic frequencies fit in between the harmonic frequencies. Harmonics sound simple, familiar, and pleasant to our ears. Nonharmonics, which are often produced by gongs, bells, and other percussion instruments, sound more complicated. If played correctly, the tritare can produce many nonharmonics at once. The researchers, who are at the University of Moncton in New Brunswick, say that the tritare's sound is beautiful and has lots of potential for musical expression. "Sounds which are richer and less safe harmonically . . . provide inspiration and ways to musically express different things," says Samuel Gaudet, one of the inventors. Other researchers are more skeptical. "To my ears [the tritare] just sounded like a badly out-of-tune instrument," says acoustics specialist Bernard Richardson of Cardiff University in Wales.

Extra Strings for New Sounds
Extra Strings for New Sounds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™