Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
A Seabird's Endless Summer
Behavior
Body clocks
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Wired for Math
Birds
Emus
Finches
Backyard Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
A Light Delay
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
An Ancient Spider's Web
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Life trapped under a glacier
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Environment
Fungus Hunt
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
What is groundwater
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Freshwater Fish
Barracudas
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Building a Food Pyramid
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Snails
Moths
Mammals
Elephants
Kodiak Bear
Orangutans
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Black Hole Journey
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Assembling the Tree of Life
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Caimans
Crocodiles
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Moons
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
Reach for the Sky
A Light Delay
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Reach for the Sky
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
A Change in Climate
Where rivers run uphill
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!

Experts claim that reading to children is important for various reasons. While most parents realise this is true, how many actually understand why parent-and-child reading is so widely encouraged? What does the child gain for the experience and what do parents, in turn, gain from reading to their children?

Bonding

Any parent or carer can tell you that story time is the very best time of the day. It’s great to sit and cuddle together, with no (or few) distractions and for more wriggly children or those who think they have grown too big for hugs, it can be especially precious. It’s the chance to be close, to have each other’s undivided attention and enjoy the moment together that’s so special. On top of that it’s a great chance to find out more about your child’s likes, dislikes, fears and hopes. From a very early age children will show you their preferences in colours, pictures and types of story.They react to stories and their messages and look to you to validate those preferences and feelings.Talking through these things as the child grows up gives the chance to stay close, understand one another and have fun together.

 

Key early skills

The earlier a child experiences books and the concept of reading, the easier he will find it to begin to recognise the shapes of words and letters from an early age. Children are also more likely to develop a long-term love of reading. It is never too early to start! A child who develops the habit of reading alone and with his parents usually has an advantage when it comes to vocabulary, spelling, imagination, reading and writing at school.

Problem solving and facing difficult subjects

Every child will face little difficulties in life. Children will also see their friends and family experience problems from time to time. Some, in fact most by adulthood, will unfortunately face bigger issues too. Reading stories together helps children to explore ways to deal with these difficult issues and helps them to develop the skills to solve problems in their own lives. Seeing characters struggle with similar dilemmas, or even different ones from which lessons can be extracted, is immensely helpful.

A story book can explore a variety of issues, from small ones such as using manners and sharing with your friends to larger life changes like starting nursery, moving house and divorce. Even bigger issues which can be difficult to explain to a child, such as death, bullying and racism, can be addressed in story books which make the subject more accessible. Children can get intensely involved in these stories and while they can see themselves in the character’s places the story offers a certain removal from the situation, allowing the child to observe as an outsider and explore the issue in a safe environment. You can walk away from a book if it gets too much, or talk it through and then go back to solve the problem. Those who continue to read into adulthood will find books still give that benefit – the ability to explore difficult subjects and situations within a controlled environment.

Imagination

Some of the loveliest moments of parenthood include watching your child acting out stories you loved as a kid. Reading fires the imagination and fuels imaginative play, which is vital to child development. It can introduce a child to fantasy worlds or a different culture. Hearing and reading new (and old) stories expands the mind, introducing new ideas, words and concepts and developing the creative part of the brain.

This guest post was written on behalf of Notting Hill Editions who publish a range of gift books. You can find out more by visiting their website – *Notting Hill Editions*

Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™