Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Cacophony Acoustics
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Behavior
Between a rock and a wet place
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Pain Expectations
Birds
Roadrunners
Storks
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
The Buzz about Caffeine
Computers
Middle school science adventures
Lighting goes digital
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Middle school science adventures
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Indoor ozone stopper
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
A Plankhouse Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Electric Ray
Sturgeons
Saltwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Caterpillars
Mosquitos
Scallops
Mammals
African Elephants
Gray Whale
Flying Foxes
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Electric Backpack
Road Bumps
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Bright Blooms That Glow
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Chameleons
Boa Constrictors
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Planning for Mars
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Reach for the Sky
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Troubles with Hubble
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Either Martians or Mars has gas

Cows and Mars have at least one thing in common ó methane. Like flatulent (or farting) cows that produce the gas, the Red Planet releases clouds of methane, according to a recent study. Researchers wonder whether colonies of bacteria hidden beneath Marsí red surface could be the cause. The gas comes from three different areas of the planet, reports Mike Mumma, a NASA scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. At each location, the amount of methane fluctuated throughout the year. The biggest plumes were in the Martian summer and the smallest during the planetís winter. Other research teams have claimed to find Martian methane, but this was the first time that anyone could say so for sure. Detecting the methane clouds was no easy task. The scientists measured Marsí methane levels for three Martian years (equivalent to seven Earth years) using three special telescopes on Earth. These instruments can detect an invisible kind of light called infrared light. Scientists use these infrared telescopes to measure gases in space. But since the telescopes were on Earth, they also measured gases in our atmosphere. So the scientists had to use some tricks to figure out which gases came from Earth and which came from Mars. ďMumma and his team have been painstakingly careful,Ē says Christopher Chyba, an astrobiologist (someone who studies extraterrestrial life) at Princeton University. ďThe reward is that we have observations of methane that show variations over season and by location. Itís fantastic.Ē Methane is an unstable compound. Unless there is a constant source of the gas, the methane on Mars would eventually disappear. Spotting the methane over several years means that it is replenished regularly, Mumma said. The scientists donít know for sure what is causing methane to spew from Marsí rocky floor. But they have a couple ideas. It could be that the gas is trapped in ice-covered rocks. In the summer, the planet warms, and the ice melts. Then the gas could slip out of cracks in the rock. When winter rolls around again, the ice reforms and plugs up the leaks. That could explain why there is more methane in the summer than in the winter. In the other scenario, the methane is still trapped, but this time itís locked inside little molecular cages called clathrates. These are basically chunks of ice with lots of methane inside. The summer sun unlocks the cages and frees the methane. Neither of these hypotheses explains what creates the methane in the first place. That is still a bit of a mystery. About 90 percent of the methane in Earthís atmosphere comes from livestock and rotting plants, but bacteria also create the gas. Itís possible that Marsí methane could be coming from bacteria too. But itís too soon to say. There is not enough evidence yet to say one way or another, Chyba says. That will be the next challenge for Mumma and his team ó finding out if living organisms on Mars produce all that methane. But one thing is for sure: Itís not coming from cows.

Either Martians or Mars has gas
Either Martians or Mars has gas








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™