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Microbes at the Gas Pump
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Little Beetle, Big Horns
Professor Ant
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Brainy bees know two from three
Seeing red means danger ahead
The Disappearing Newspaper
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Quails
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Watching out for vultures
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
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Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Programming with Alice
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
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Dino Babies
Meet the new dinos
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Recipe for a Hurricane
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
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The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Bald Eagles Forever
Spotty Survival
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The Taming of the Cat
Of Lice and Old Clothes
A Plankhouse Past
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Basking Sharks
Sting Ray
Mahi-Mahi
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GSAT English Rules
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Whoever vs. Whomever
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
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GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
A New Touch
Electricity's Spark of Life
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Ticks
Horseshoe Crabs
Worms
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Hoofed Mammals
African Wildedbeest
Caribou
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The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
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Einstein's Skateboard
Extra Strings for New Sounds
One ring around them all
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Stalking Plants by Scent
Farms sprout in cities
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
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Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
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What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
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Charged cars that would charge
Reach for the Sky
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Arctic Melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Eels

True eels are fish of the order Anguilliformes, which consists of 4 suborders, 19 families, 110 genera and 400 species. Most eels are predators. All shapes and sizes: Depending on their species, eels can reach from 10 cm to 3 m, and weigh up to 65 kg. The number of rays of the gill webbing ranges from 6 to 51, though sometimes they are absent altogether. Their fins are always spineless. The back and anal fins are long, usually connecting with the tail fin. The belly and chest fins are absent. The shoulder girdle is separate from the skull. The scales are cycloid or absent. Hideout: Most eels prefer to dwell in shallow waters, hide at the bottom layer of the ocean, sometimes in holes. Only the Anguillidae family comes to fresh water to dwell there (not to breed). Some eels dwell in deep water (in case of family Synaphobranchidae, this comes to a depth of 4,000 m), or are active swimmers (the family Nemichthyidae - to the depth of 500 m). The life cycle of the eel was a mystery for a very long time, because larval eels look very different from adult eels, and were thought to be a separate species. See eel life history. An eel sandwich: Freshwater eels (unagi) and marine eels (Conger eel, anago) are commonly used in Japanese cuisine. Eels are used in Cantonese and Shanghai cuisine too. The European eel and other freshwater eels are eaten in Europe, the United States, and other places around the world. A traditional London food is jellied eels. The Basque delicacy, angulas, consists of deep-fried elvers. Uniquely in Europe, hand netting is the only legal way of catching eels in England, and has been practiced for thousands of years on the River Parrett and River Severn.

Eels
Eels








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