Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
New Elephant-Shrew
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Young Ants in the Kitchen
Behavior
Puberty gone wild
Girls are cool for school
Monkeys in the Mirror
Birds
Doves
Lovebirds
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Computers
Lighting goes digital
Look into My Eyes
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Life trapped under a glacier
Environment
Snow Traps
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
The Birds are Falling
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Manta Rays
Perches
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
The Essence of Celery
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Monkeys Count
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
A Fix for Injured Knees
Dreaming makes perfect
Heart Revival
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Insects
Squid
Mammals
Boxers
Orangutans
Mule
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Alligators
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Cool as a Jupiter
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Riding Sunlight
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Charged cars that would charge
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Early Maya Writing

More than 2,000 years ago, a Maya scribe painted a pattern of thick black lines on a pyramid wall. Over centuries, these hieroglyphs disappeared from view as people took apart the wall and built bigger pyramids on top of the original structure. Now, archaeologists tunneling deep in the ruins of a pyramid in Guatemala have discovered bits of the scribe's writing. The text dates to between 300 B.C. and 200 B.C. It's the earliest known example of Maya writing, the researchers say. The hieroglyphs were originally part of a richly decorated room painted with colorful murals, the researchers say. The ancient Maya even painted a picture of their maize god on one of the doorjambs. The hieroglyphic signs could have a religious meaning, but the archaeologists can't be sure. The writing is so old that most of it is unrecognizable. One sign that the archaeologists can understand is an early version of the word for lord, noble, or ruler. The sign, pronounced "ajaw," is probably part of a title. Another sign looks similar to a hand holding a brush or a sharp tool, the archeologists say. Perhaps the picture provides a clue to the hieroglyph's meaning. The archaeologists found helpful clues about the age of the hieroglyphs from nearby pieces of burned wood. By comparing the amounts of different forms of carbon in a sample, researchers calculated the wood's age. This is a process called radiocarbon dating. Once they knew how old the wood was, they estimated the age of the writing sample. Before archaeologists found these hieroglyphs in San Bartolo, the oldest known examples of Maya writing were from between 100 B.C. and 100 A.D. The new discovery bumps back the date a few centuries. It appears that the Maya were creating a writing system and painting hieroglyphs at the same time as other cultures to the north in Mexico.—K. Ramsayer

Early Maya Writing
Early Maya Writing








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™