Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Getting the dirt on carbon
Microbes at the Gas Pump
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Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
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The Littlest Lemurs
Little Bee Brains That Could
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
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Calculating crime
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
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Flightless Birds
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Chemistry and Materials
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Hair Detectives
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Small but WISE
Graphene's superstrength
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
Meet your mysterious relative
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Volcano Wakes Up
Environment
Food Web Woes
Plastic Meals for Seals
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Skates and Rays
Electric Eel
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
The Essence of Celery
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
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GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
Heavy Sleep
Germ Zapper
Invertebrates
Spiders
Walking Sticks
Oysters
Mammals
Primates
Canines
Koalas
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Dreams of Floating in Space
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Cobras
Gila Monsters
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
The two faces of Mars
Dark Galaxy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Dancing with Robots
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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Don't Eat That Sandwich!

Oops! In the rush to get to school, you drop a piece of toast on the floor. Do you throw it away or decide it's still OK to eat? If you're like most people, you eat it. Maybe you follow the "5-second rule," which claims foods are safe to eat if you pick them up within 5 seconds of dropping them. But you might want to think again. Scientists now say that 5 seconds are all it takes for foods to become contaminated with enough bacteria to make you sick. Bacteria are single-celled organisms that can cause many kinds of illnesses. Some kinds of bacteria can grow on food. If we eat foods on which these bacteria are growing, we can become sick. Common symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea. One of these food-borne bacteria is Salmonella. It makes 1.4 million people sick every year. Earlier this year, 370 people became sick after eating peanut butter that had been contaminated with Salmonella at the manufacturing plant. Salmonella are often found in raw eggs and chicken. Cooking kills these bacteria, which is why it is so important to cook eggs, chicken, and other foods thoroughly. Being a good housekeeper is a second tip for preventing infection. If household surfaces aren't washed thoroughly, they can support Salmonella for weeks. But how long does it take these bacteria to attach to food? To answer that question, a team of scientists at Clemson University in South Carolina decided to test the 5-second rule, using sandwich ingredients. First, they placed a known amount of Salmonella cells on three surfaces: wood, tile, and carpet. They placed a slice of bread and a slice of bologna on each surface for 5, 30, or 60 seconds. After just 5 seconds, both the bread and bologna picked up enough bacteria to make you sick. "Someone making a sandwich might follow someone who, a day before, used that surface to cut meat or another raw food. It might not look contaminated, but could have bacteria that would be harmful," said Paul Dawson, the food scientist who led the study. So, forget the 5-second rule. If your toast lands on the floor, toss it out. Stick a fresh slice of bread in the toaster. And this time, be careful not to drop it!—Jennifer Cutraro

Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Don't Eat That Sandwich!








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