Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Seeds of the Future
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
Animals
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Fishing for Giant Squid
Return of the Lost Limbs
Behavior
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Surprise Visitor
Reading Body Language
Birds
Owls
Swans
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
A Spider's Silky Strength
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Batteries built by Viruses
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Nonstop Robot
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Shrinking Glaciers
Unnatural Disasters
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Environment
Ready, unplug, drive
Food Web Woes
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
A Big Discovery about Little People
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Goldfish
Mahi-Mahi
Trout
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Chew for Health
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Disease Detectives
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Earthworms
Clams
Tapeworms
Mammals
African Wild Dog
Echidnas
Bloodhounds
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Electric Backpack
Project Music
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Flower family knows its roots
Springing forward
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Crocodilians
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Melting Snow on Mars
Ready, Set, Supernova
Unveiling Titan
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Weaving with Light
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth

As the star of Jurassic Park III, the spinosaurus dominated the screen, displaying a huge sail on its back and baring distinctive teeth. Millions of years ago, this large, meat-eating dinosaur may have hunted fish. Its long snout and narrow jaws resemble those of modern, fish-eating crocodiles. Now, it looks like fish weren't the only animals on the spinosaur menu. Paleontologists from France recently uncovered fossil evidence in northeastern Brazil that spinosaurs also may have feasted on flying reptiles. The scientists found three fossil neck bones, buried in rocks that are about 100 million years old. One of the bones had a piece of a tooth sticking out of it. The neck bones belonged to an ancient flying reptile called a pterosaur. The animal was probably about 3.3 meters long from wingtip to wingtip. The tooth fragment found in its neck was about 1 centimeter long. It was shaped like a cone, and its enamel coating was smooth and thin. Based on these features, the researchers suggest that the tooth belonged to a type of spinosaur called Irritator challengeri. This spinosaur typically grew to be 10 meters long, walked on two feet, and ate meat. Paleontologists had previously found remains of fish scales in the stomachs of ancient spinosaurs. And some researchers had unearthed a spinosaur that apparently had eaten parts of a young plant-eating dino. The new finding shows that flying reptiles were also on the menu. The researchers still don't know if the spinosaur killed the pterosaur or just chomped on one that was already dead. Either way, the predator probably didn't mind losing a bit of tooth. Spinosaurs were constantly replacing their teeth.E. Sohn

Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™