Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
A Seabird's Endless Summer
Feeding School for Meerkats
Behavior
Meet your mysterious relative
Memory by Hypnosis
Brain cells take a break
Birds
Flightless Birds
Quails
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
The Buzz about Caffeine
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Nonstop Robot
Look into My Eyes
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Deep Drilling at Sea
Springing forward
Petrified Lightning
Environment
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
The Birds are Falling
A Change in Time
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Lampreys
Goldfish
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
A Taste for Cheese
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Prime Time for Cicadas
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Taste Messenger
Surviving Olympic Heat
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Spiders
Mussels
Flies
Mammals
African Gorillas
Glider
Goats
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Dreams of Floating in Space
Project Music
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Fungus Hunt
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Black Mamba
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Where rivers run uphill
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth

As the star of Jurassic Park III, the spinosaurus dominated the screen, displaying a huge sail on its back and baring distinctive teeth. Millions of years ago, this large, meat-eating dinosaur may have hunted fish. Its long snout and narrow jaws resemble those of modern, fish-eating crocodiles. Now, it looks like fish weren't the only animals on the spinosaur menu. Paleontologists from France recently uncovered fossil evidence in northeastern Brazil that spinosaurs also may have feasted on flying reptiles. The scientists found three fossil neck bones, buried in rocks that are about 100 million years old. One of the bones had a piece of a tooth sticking out of it. The neck bones belonged to an ancient flying reptile called a pterosaur. The animal was probably about 3.3 meters long from wingtip to wingtip. The tooth fragment found in its neck was about 1 centimeter long. It was shaped like a cone, and its enamel coating was smooth and thin. Based on these features, the researchers suggest that the tooth belonged to a type of spinosaur called Irritator challengeri. This spinosaur typically grew to be 10 meters long, walked on two feet, and ate meat. Paleontologists had previously found remains of fish scales in the stomachs of ancient spinosaurs. And some researchers had unearthed a spinosaur that apparently had eaten parts of a young plant-eating dino. The new finding shows that flying reptiles were also on the menu. The researchers still don't know if the spinosaur killed the pterosaur or just chomped on one that was already dead. Either way, the predator probably didn't mind losing a bit of tooth. Spinosaurs were constantly replacing their teeth.—E. Sohn

Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™