Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Toads
Animals
Awake at Night
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
How to Fly Like a Bat
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Night of the living ants
Birds
Hummingbirds
Ospreys
Owls
Chemistry and Materials
Screaming for Ice Cream
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Computers
A Light Delay
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
A Great Quake Coming?
Environment
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Missing Tigers in India
A Change in Leaf Color
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Early Maya Writing
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Sharks
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Scholarship
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
It's a Math World for Animals
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Scallops
Snails
Ticks
Mammals
Whales
Rhinoceros
Quolls
Parents
How children learn
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
One ring around them all
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Nature's Alphabet
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Pythons
Asp
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Unveiling Titan
Holes in Martian moon mystery
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Crime Lab
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Recipe for a Hurricane
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Dino Babies

Some dinosaurs needed babysitters, too Scientists have recently analyzed the oldest dinosaur eggs ever discovered with embryos still inside. The study suggests that the dinos couldn't take care of themselves when they first hatched, say the researchers, who come from the University of Toronto at Mississauga in Ontario. Just like human babies, the little dinosaurs relied on grown-ups for help. The study closely examined two of seven eggs that were discovered 30 years ago in South Africa. The 190-million-year-old eggs belonged to a common plant-eating dinosaur called Massospondylus carinatus, the researchers say. Fully grown, the creatures measured about 5 meters (over 16 feet) long. Six of the eggs held bones and other remains that filled their shells. That fact, plus the highly developed state of the bones, suggests that the baby dinos were nearly ready to hatch. As big as the two embryos were, all of them had empty tooth sockets except one, which only had a single tooth. That means that M. carinatus babies were probably born without teeth or with teeth that were soft and so not preserved as fossils. The scientists say that the youngest of these dinosaurs wouldn't have been able to bite leaves off of trees. Adults would have had to feed them. Grown-up M. carinatus walked on two legs. However, the shape of the embryo skeletons made the researchers conclude that the babies traveled on all fours. They had large heads, thick necks, and small pelvic bones, so they would have been awkward and in need of guidance from older, bigger relatives. Funny enough, dinosaurs that lived later on were built like M. carinatus babies even as adults and grew up to be huge, weighing up to 100 tons and stretching up to 40 meters long. It's possible that these ancient embryos were an early sign of what was yet to come.E. Sohn

Dino Babies
Dino Babies








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™