Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Revenge of the Cowbirds
A Seabird's Endless Summer
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Making Sense of Scents
Taking a Spill for Science
Birds
Finches
Roadrunners
Cardinals
Chemistry and Materials
Screaming for Ice Cream
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
Lighting goes digital
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fingerprinting Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
Hall of Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Wave of Destruction
A Global Warming Flap
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Environment
Saving Wetlands
Plant Gas
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Flounder
Perches
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Healing Honey
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Detecting True Art
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Taste Messenger
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Invertebrates
Camel Spiders
Centipedes
Leeches
Mammals
Narwhals
Killer Whales
Cougars
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Particle Zoo
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
The algae invasion
Sweet, Sticky Science
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Crocodilians
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Melting Snow on Mars
A Smashing Display
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Shape Shifting
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Deep Krill

A little over a year ago, scientists lowered a camera to the bottom of the Southern Ocean off the coast of Antarctica. The video images from that camera surprised them. Three thousand meters (9,800 feet) below the surface of the sea, the researchers observed what looked like an animal called Antarctic krill. Scientists had thought these shrimplike creatures lived only in the upper ocean, says Andrew Clarke of the British Antarctic Survey based in Cambridge, England.Clarke made the discovery on a science cruise during the South Pole summer of 2006–2007 (a period which corresponds to the Northern Hemisphere's winter). By that time of year, tiny floating organisms called plankton (a favorite food of krill) have multiplied in a big burst at the water's surface. From there, they slowly drift downward. Using a remotely operated vehicle that carried a video camera, Clarke and colleagues saw krill feeding on falling plankton. By studying the video footage, they identified the krill as the classic Antarctic species, Euphausia superba. The species was fairly easy to identify. It is relatively large, for one thing, growing up to 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) long. It has distinctive red markings. And it feeds in an unusual way when it's near the bottom. A krill nosedives into the sediment at the bottom, then scoops debris out of the water with spiny structures on its legs. Based on the video evidence, "there isn't really much else it could be" other than the Antarctic krill, says Stephen Nicol of the Australian Antarctica Division in Kingston, Tasmania. Scientists have occasionally spotted this species of krill several hundred meters deep, but never in water as deep as this. So, the scientists are not exactly sure what's going on. One possibility is that the krill simply stuck with their food as it sank ever deeper. If big groups of krill do this often, scientists might have to revise their ideas about how many krill there are and how nutrients move through oceans. "If the observation proves true about the krill at 3000 m," writes Peter Wiebe of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts (who's currently on a different research expedition), "then it shows how little we really understand about how the ocean ecosystem is structured and functions."—Emily Sohn

Deep Krill
Deep Krill








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™