Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Animals
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Young Ants in the Kitchen
Revenge of the Cowbirds
Behavior
Reading Body Language
Fish needs see-through head
Lightening Your Mood
Birds
Cassowaries
Owls
Cardinals
Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
The Taste of Bubbles
The hottest soup in New York
Computers
The Shape of the Internet
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
The man who rocked biology to its core
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Petrified Lightning
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Greener Diet
Environment
Blooming Jellies
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
Skates and Rays
Tuna
Eels
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
The Color of Health
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Pronouns
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Play for Science
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Hear, Hear
Germ Zapper
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Mosquitos
Shrimps
Caterpillars
Mammals
Canines
Pitbulls
Badgers
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Nature's Alphabet
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Gila Monsters
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Solving a Sedna Mystery
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
A Planet from the Early Universe
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Warmest Year on Record
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Cousin Earth

As their search continues, astronomers are finding more and more planets orbiting nearby stars. This time, they've detected a solid planet that's just 15 light-years from Earth. Many details about the planet remain unknown because the astronomers didn't see it directly. Instead, they were able to detect how the planet's gravity makes its star wobble a little bit. Out of 156 planets discovered so far in other solar systems, the new extrasolar planet is the smallest one yet found. It's about 7.5 times heavier than Earth. Along with two, much bigger planets, the new world orbits a star called Gliese 876. The planet takes just 1.9 days to complete an orbit around Gliese 876. So, its year is much, much shorter than ours. It's so close to its star that its surface is hot enough to roast a chicken. Most extrasolar planets that have been found so far are big balls of gas, like Jupiter and Saturn. Because the planet's mass is low, it probably couldn't hold onto much gas. So, scientists suspect that it's rocky. "This could be the first [known] rocky planet around any normal star other than the sun," says team member Jack Lissauer of NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif. Scientists are still trying to figure out how rocky planets might form so close to their stars. Whatever the answer, the new discovery gives researchers confidence that they will one day find even closer cousins to Earth somewhere in the universe. And, on a planet resembling Earth, they might also discover traces of life as we know it.—E. Sohn

Cousin Earth
Cousin Earth








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