Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Springing forward
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
A Wild Ferret Rise
The Littlest Lemurs
Behavior
Girls are cool for school
A Light Delay
Making light of sleep
Birds
Kiwis
Lovebirds
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Makeup Science
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Pencil Thin
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
New twists for phantom limbs
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Wave of Destruction
Island of Hope
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
A Stormy History
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Trout
Sting Ray
Barracudas
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Packing Fat
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Monkeys Count
Math Naturals
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Sun Screen
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Flies
Insects
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Dachshunds
Moose
Dolphins
Parents
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
IceCube Science
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Springing forward
Flower family knows its roots
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Turtles
Lizards
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Black Holes That Burp
Planets on the Edge
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Machine Copy
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Troubles with Hubble
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The solar system's biggest junkyard
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Add your Article

Copycat Monkeys

Imitation can be annoying—like when your little brother or sister repeats everything you say. It can also be fun—like during a game of follow-the-leader. Imitation is also an important way for babies to learn about interacting with adults. Scientists have observed such copycat behavior in human and chimpanzee infants. A new study adds monkeys to the list. The study included 21 baby macaques. All were tested five times during the first 30 days of their lives. During each session, a person held a monkey so that it could see his face. Each time, the experimenter started with a plain face followed by a series of displays that included sticking out the tongue, opening the mouth, smacking the lips, opening a hand, and spinning a face-sized colored disk. Between each behavior, the experimenter again made a plain face. In response to these behaviors, many of the day-old macaques smacked their lips after seeing a mouth opening and closing, but they didn't copy what they had seen. At 3 days old, 13 of 16 macaques smacked their lips and stuck their tongues out after the experimenter did. They didn't imitate any other behaviors. At 7 days, only four of the monkeys continued to copy the lip-smacking behavior. By day 14, none of the monkeys was imitating the experimenters. Baby monkeys appear to imitate the same facial expressions in their mothers during the first week of life, the scientists say. Adult macaques smack their lips and stick their tongues out when they are being friendly and cooperative. Macaques communicate mostly by looking at each other, face to face. This might explain why imitation is an important skill among these animals. Next, the scientists want to figure out if baby monkeys who imitate adults grow up to be smarter or better adjusted than those who do their own thing. In contrast to macaques, human and chimp babies start imitating others at 2 to 3 weeks of age. The behavior usually continues for several months. Macaque imitation starts sooner and occurs over a shorter time because these monkeys grow up faster and become part of a social group much more quickly that people or apes do. The saying "monkey see, monkey do" appears to be true, after all.—E. Sohn

Copycat Monkeys
Copycat Monkeys








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™