Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Newts
Animals
Insect Stowaways
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Little Bee Brains That Could
Behavior
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Chimpanzee Hunting Tools
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
Vultures
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
Bandages that could bite back
The Buzz about Caffeine
Computers
Earth from the inside out
Getting in Touch with Touch
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Earth's Poles in Peril
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Acid Snails
Spotty Survival
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
A Long Haul
The Taming of the Cat
Fish
Skates
Seahorses
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Moths
Clams
Jellyfish
Mammals
Rottweilers
Beagles
Rats
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Springing forward
Reptiles
Geckos
Snapping Turtles
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Return to Space
Chaos Among the Planets
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Young Scientists Take Flight
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Flying the Hyper Skies
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Cool Penguins

Raising a baby takes a lot of work, especially when that baby is a king penguin. Now, it looks like climate change will make life even harder for these birds. A new study suggests that warmer waters could shrink their numbers. Most king penguins live on the Crozet Archipelago, a group of islands in the Indian Ocean, about 1,000 miles north of Antarctica. After the penguin chicks are born in November (which is summer in the Southern Hemisphere), both parents spend 4 months collecting fish, some of which they regurgitate to feed their offspring. When the fish move to deeper waters in March, the adults leave their chicks alone for months. They swim hundreds of miles south. There, near the Antarctic ice, they spend the winter eating seafood, such as squid, to replenish their own energy stores. In October, nearly a year after their chicks were born, the parents return to feed and finish raising them. Scientists from the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Strasbourg, France, have been studying king penguins on the Crozet Archipelago for a decade. Starting in 1998, Yvon Le Maho and colleagues implanted electronic ID tags under the skin of hundreds of penguins. These are the same types of tags you might put in your dog or cat, so you can track them if they get lost. The tags have allowed Le Maho's team to identify individual birds and keep track of details about them, such as how long they live, whether they return from their winter trips, and if their chicks manage to survive the winter. To see whether water temperatures affect the penguins, Le Maho compared his data with temperature records. Ocean surface temperatures vary from year to year. And previous research had shown that fewer squid, fish and other creatures grow when the water is warmer. Le Maho suspected that this drop in the food supply would make it harder for adult penguins to survive the tough times ahead. Indeed, his results showed that fewer adults survived during winters when the water was especially warm. Just a quarter of a degree (0.26°C to be exact) warming of seawater reduces adult penguins' survival by 9 percent in later years. King penguins can live for up to 30 years. And for now, the population still appears healthy. But a warming trend could spell big trouble for a bird that depends on cold and ice.—Emily Sohn

Cool Penguins
Cool Penguins








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™