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Seeds of the Future
Springing forward
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A Tongue and a Half
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
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Listening to Birdsong
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Swedish Rhapsody
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The science of disappearing
The Taste of Bubbles
A Framework for Growing Bone
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Small but WISE
Graphene's superstrength
Hitting the redo button on evolution
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The man who rocked biology to its core
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Earth
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Island of Hope
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
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Where rivers run uphill
A Change in Leaf Color
Whale Watch
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
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Mako Sharks
Perches
Trout
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Recipe for Health
Strong Bones for Life
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
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Who vs. Whom
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
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Detecting True Art
Prime Time for Cicadas
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Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Insects
Bees
Tapeworms
Mammals
Cows
Sea Lions
Badgers
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Road Bumps
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Chameleons
Sea Turtles
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Ringing Saturn
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Arctic Melt
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Clams

Clams are shelled marine or freshwater mollusks. The term "clam" is often used to refer to any bivalve (a mollusk whose body is protected by two symmetrical shells) that is not an oyster, mussel, or a scallop, and that has a more-or-less oval shape. An exception is the razor clam, which has an elongate shell that suggests an old-fashioned straight razor. Clams can live up to 150 years old - or perhaps longer (science suspects that some larger quahogs found off the East Coast of the US may be 200 years old). Hard or Soft? Clams can be hard-shelled or soft-shelled, according to the degree of calcification of their shells, according to species. They are eaten raw, steamed, boiled, baked or fried, again (often) according to species. Clam chowder is a popular soup in the U.S. in which clams figure strongly. Floating down the river current... The mating habits of clams varies according to the waters in which they live. In river clams, the male releases sperm into the water and the river current carries it downstream. The female then draws sperm in to fertilize eggs still inside her body. Mating tip to males - stay upstream! Fertilization odds are poor unless the male is upstream of the female. For ocean clams, the male also expels sperm, however the female releases the eggs from her body into the surrounding water. Fertilization occurs only when the eggs float near the sperm. One adult survivor to tens of thousands of babies During a breeding season, a female clam makes tens of thousands of baby clams. Probably only one settles to the bottom and survives to adulthood.

Clams
Clams








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