Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Poor Devils
Insect Stowaways
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Behavior
Between a rock and a wet place
Monkeys in the Mirror
Surprise Visitor
Birds
Cassowaries
Peafowl
Cardinals
Chemistry and Materials
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Graphene's superstrength
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
Games with a Purpose
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Dinosaurs Grow Up
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
The Rise of Yellowstone
Deep Drilling at Sea
Coral Gardens
Environment
Power of the Wind
Giant snakes invading North America
Little Bits of Trouble
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
The Taming of the Cat
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Perches
Skates and Rays
Puffer Fish
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Play for Science
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Hear, Hear
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Jellyfish
Ticks
Squid
Mammals
Donkeys
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Opposum
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
A Giant Flower's New Family
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Turtles
Boa Constrictors
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Dark Galaxy
A Dusty Birthplace
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Revving Up Green Machines
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Clams

Clams are shelled marine or freshwater mollusks. The term "clam" is often used to refer to any bivalve (a mollusk whose body is protected by two symmetrical shells) that is not an oyster, mussel, or a scallop, and that has a more-or-less oval shape. An exception is the razor clam, which has an elongate shell that suggests an old-fashioned straight razor. Clams can live up to 150 years old - or perhaps longer (science suspects that some larger quahogs found off the East Coast of the US may be 200 years old). Hard or Soft? Clams can be hard-shelled or soft-shelled, according to the degree of calcification of their shells, according to species. They are eaten raw, steamed, boiled, baked or fried, again (often) according to species. Clam chowder is a popular soup in the U.S. in which clams figure strongly. Floating down the river current... The mating habits of clams varies according to the waters in which they live. In river clams, the male releases sperm into the water and the river current carries it downstream. The female then draws sperm in to fertilize eggs still inside her body. Mating tip to males - stay upstream! Fertilization odds are poor unless the male is upstream of the female. For ocean clams, the male also expels sperm, however the female releases the eggs from her body into the surrounding water. Fertilization occurs only when the eggs float near the sperm. One adult survivor to tens of thousands of babies During a breeding season, a female clam makes tens of thousands of baby clams. Probably only one settles to the bottom and survives to adulthood.

Clams
Clams








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™