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Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Flush-Free Fertilizer
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
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Thieves of a Feather
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Vent Worms Like It Hot
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Bringing fish back up to size
Taking a Spill for Science
Reading Body Language
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Carnivorous Birds
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When frog gender flips
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
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The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Galaxies on the go
The Shape of the Internet
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Big Fish in Ancient Waters
An Ancient Spider's Web
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Earth from the inside out
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
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Acid Snails
Plastic Meals for Seals
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Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Flounder
Flashlight Fishes
Mahi-Mahi
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A Taste for Cheese
Recipe for Health
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Math of the World
Human Body
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Cockroaches
Krill
Mammals
Lhasa Apsos
Bandicoot
Bloodhounds
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Invisibility Ring
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fungus Hunt
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Alligators
Iguanas
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Pluto's New Moons
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Toy Challenge
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on the Road, Again
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
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Clams

Clams are shelled marine or freshwater mollusks. The term "clam" is often used to refer to any bivalve (a mollusk whose body is protected by two symmetrical shells) that is not an oyster, mussel, or a scallop, and that has a more-or-less oval shape. An exception is the razor clam, which has an elongate shell that suggests an old-fashioned straight razor. Clams can live up to 150 years old - or perhaps longer (science suspects that some larger quahogs found off the East Coast of the US may be 200 years old). Hard or Soft? Clams can be hard-shelled or soft-shelled, according to the degree of calcification of their shells, according to species. They are eaten raw, steamed, boiled, baked or fried, again (often) according to species. Clam chowder is a popular soup in the U.S. in which clams figure strongly. Floating down the river current... The mating habits of clams varies according to the waters in which they live. In river clams, the male releases sperm into the water and the river current carries it downstream. The female then draws sperm in to fertilize eggs still inside her body. Mating tip to males - stay upstream! Fertilization odds are poor unless the male is upstream of the female. For ocean clams, the male also expels sperm, however the female releases the eggs from her body into the surrounding water. Fertilization occurs only when the eggs float near the sperm. One adult survivor to tens of thousands of babies During a breeding season, a female clam makes tens of thousands of baby clams. Probably only one settles to the bottom and survives to adulthood.

Clams
Clams








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