Agriculture
Springing forward
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Toads
Animals
Insect Stowaways
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Roboroach and Company
Behavior
Longer lives for wild elephants
Brainy bees know two from three
Sugar-pill medicine
Birds
Kookaburras
Rheas
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
Undercover Detectives
Salt secrets
The Taste of Bubbles
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Troubles with Hubble
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Fossil Forests
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Ancient Heights
Environment
To Catch a Dragonfly
Plastic Meals for Seals
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Parrotfish
Mahi-Mahi
Skates
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
The Color of Health
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Math of the World
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
A New Touch
Gut Microbes and Weight
Invertebrates
Giant Clam
Corals
Wasps
Mammals
Echidnas
Quolls
Basset Hounds
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
How children learn
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Extra Strings for New Sounds
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
A Change in Leaf Color
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Turtles
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Chaos Among the Planets
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Searching for Alien Life
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Robots on the Road, Again
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories

 

Medicine comes in lots of different packages. Painkillers in a tablet can make your headache go away. Antibiotic cream from a tube can prevent your cuts from becoming infected. But can medicine come packaged in chicken eggs?

A team of scientists from Scotland says yes. They’ve engineered special chickens that lay eggs with disease-treating drugs inside.

These drugs are made of molecules called proteins. Animals make thousands of proteins—they’re the main ingredient in skin, hair, milk, and meat. Since animals can make proteins easily, they’re good candidates for making protein drugs.

Researchers have already made cows, sheep, and goats that pump out protein drugs in their milk. But chickens are cheaper to take care of, need less room, and grow faster than these other animals. Those qualities could make chickens a better choice to become living drug factories, says Simon Lillico of the Roslin Institute near Edinburgh, Scotland.

Lillico and a team of researchers changed chickens’ DNA—the code that tells cells how to make proteins—so that the birds’ cells made two protein drugs. One drug can treat skin cancer, and the other treats a nerve disease called multiple sclerosis.

The scientists altered the chickens’ DNA so that the birds made these drugs only in their egg whites. This protects the chickens’ bodies from the drugs’ possible harmful effects and makes it easy for scientists to collect the drugs.

These special chickens can pass on their drug-laying abilities to their chicks. So far, the Scottish researchers have bred five generations of drug-producing birds.

The scientists need to improve these chickens before they roost in drug companies’ labs. The birds don’t make enough drugs to treat people yet. But once the researchers perfect their technique, you might eventually take your medicine sunny-side up.—C. Brownlee

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™