Agriculture
Watering the Air
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Thieves of a Feather
Behavior
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Ospreys
Pheasants
Rheas
Chemistry and Materials
Heaviest named element is official
Earth from the inside out
The Taste of Bubbles
Computers
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Middle school science adventures
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Snow Traps
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Catching Some Rays
Finding the Past
Ancient Cave Behavior
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Marlin
Hammerhead Sharks
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Healing Honey
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Praying Mantis
Moths
Ticks
Mammals
Elephants
Shih Tzus
Polar Bear
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Speedy stars
One ring around them all
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Stalking Plants by Scent
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Chameleons
Boa Constrictors
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Ringing Saturn
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Dancing with Robots
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Robots on a Rocky Road
Reach for the Sky
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Warmest Year on Record
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories

 

Medicine comes in lots of different packages. Painkillers in a tablet can make your headache go away. Antibiotic cream from a tube can prevent your cuts from becoming infected. But can medicine come packaged in chicken eggs?

A team of scientists from Scotland says yes. They’ve engineered special chickens that lay eggs with disease-treating drugs inside.

These drugs are made of molecules called proteins. Animals make thousands of proteins—they’re the main ingredient in skin, hair, milk, and meat. Since animals can make proteins easily, they’re good candidates for making protein drugs.

Researchers have already made cows, sheep, and goats that pump out protein drugs in their milk. But chickens are cheaper to take care of, need less room, and grow faster than these other animals. Those qualities could make chickens a better choice to become living drug factories, says Simon Lillico of the Roslin Institute near Edinburgh, Scotland.

Lillico and a team of researchers changed chickens’ DNA—the code that tells cells how to make proteins—so that the birds’ cells made two protein drugs. One drug can treat skin cancer, and the other treats a nerve disease called multiple sclerosis.

The scientists altered the chickens’ DNA so that the birds made these drugs only in their egg whites. This protects the chickens’ bodies from the drugs’ possible harmful effects and makes it easy for scientists to collect the drugs.

These special chickens can pass on their drug-laying abilities to their chicks. So far, the Scottish researchers have bred five generations of drug-producing birds.

The scientists need to improve these chickens before they roost in drug companies’ labs. The birds don’t make enough drugs to treat people yet. But once the researchers perfect their technique, you might eventually take your medicine sunny-side up.—C. Brownlee

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™