Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Watering the Air
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Insect Stowaways
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Thieves of a Feather
Behavior
The nerve of one animal
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Math is a real brain bender
Birds
Swifts
Pheasants
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
Popping to Perfection
The metal detector in your mouth
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Feathered Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
A Dino King's Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Getting the dirt on carbon
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Stonehenge Settlement
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Lampreys
Eels
Mako Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
How Super Are Superfruits?
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Math Naturals
Human Body
A Long Haul
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Cockroaches
Flies
Lobsters
Mammals
Yorkshire Terriers
Wildcats
Chimpanzees
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Speedy stars
Electric Backpack
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Pythons
Reptiles
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Chaos Among the Planets
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Reach for the Sky
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Flying the Hyper Skies
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories

 

Medicine comes in lots of different packages. Painkillers in a tablet can make your headache go away. Antibiotic cream from a tube can prevent your cuts from becoming infected. But can medicine come packaged in chicken eggs?

A team of scientists from Scotland says yes. They’ve engineered special chickens that lay eggs with disease-treating drugs inside.

These drugs are made of molecules called proteins. Animals make thousands of proteins—they’re the main ingredient in skin, hair, milk, and meat. Since animals can make proteins easily, they’re good candidates for making protein drugs.

Researchers have already made cows, sheep, and goats that pump out protein drugs in their milk. But chickens are cheaper to take care of, need less room, and grow faster than these other animals. Those qualities could make chickens a better choice to become living drug factories, says Simon Lillico of the Roslin Institute near Edinburgh, Scotland.

Lillico and a team of researchers changed chickens’ DNA—the code that tells cells how to make proteins—so that the birds’ cells made two protein drugs. One drug can treat skin cancer, and the other treats a nerve disease called multiple sclerosis.

The scientists altered the chickens’ DNA so that the birds made these drugs only in their egg whites. This protects the chickens’ bodies from the drugs’ possible harmful effects and makes it easy for scientists to collect the drugs.

These special chickens can pass on their drug-laying abilities to their chicks. So far, the Scottish researchers have bred five generations of drug-producing birds.

The scientists need to improve these chickens before they roost in drug companies’ labs. The birds don’t make enough drugs to treat people yet. But once the researchers perfect their technique, you might eventually take your medicine sunny-side up.—C. Brownlee

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™