Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Silk’s superpowers
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Newts
Animals
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Behavior
Nice Chimps
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Flower family knows its roots
Birds
Turkeys
Seagulls
Kiwis
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Computers
Troubles with Hubble
The Book of Life
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Environment
Inspired by Nature
Flu river
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Finding the Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
Chicken of the Sea
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Carp
Eels
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Subject and Verb Agreement
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Math of the World
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Dreaming makes perfect
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Spiders
Butterflies
Tapeworms
Mammals
Wombats
Caribou
Echidnas
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Einstein's Skateboard
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Farms sprout in cities
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Snakes
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Charged cars that would charge
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Arctic Melt
Recipe for a Hurricane
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Cats

The cat, also called the domestic cat or house cat, is a small carnivorous mammal of the subspecies Felis silvestris catus. Its most immediate pre-domestication ancestor is believed to be the African wild cat, Felis silvestris lybica. The cat has been living in close association with humans for somewhere between 3,500 and 8,000 years. There are dozens of breeds of cat, some hairless or tailless as a result of mutations, and they exist in a variety of different colors. They are skilled predators and have been known to hunt over one thousand different species for food. They are also intelligent animals, and some can be trained or learn by themselves to manipulate simple mechanisms such as lever-handled doors and flush toilets. Cats typically weigh between 2.5 and 7 kg (5.5–16 pounds) however, some breeds, such as the Maine Coon can exceed 11.3 kg (25 pounds). Some have been known to reach up to 23 kg (50 pounds) due to overfeeding. This is very unhealthy for the cat, and should be prevented through diet and exercise (playing), especially for cats living exclusively indoors. In captivity, indoor cats typically live 14 to 20 years, though the oldest-known cat lived to age 36. Domestic cats tend to live longer if they are not permitted to go outdoors (reducing the risk of injury from fights or accidents and exposure to diseases) and if they are spayed or neutered. Spaying and neutering a cat also decreases the risk of testicular and ovarian cancer, and female cats spayed before their first litter benefit from reduced risk of mammary cancer. Feral cats living in modern urban environments often live only two years, or less. Feral cats in maintained colonies can live much longer; the British Cat Action Trust reported a 19-year-old feral female. The oldest feral cat was Mark who was maintained by the British charity Cats Protection and who reached 26 years of age. Cats can also produce a purring noise that typically indicates that the cat is happy, but also can mean that it feels distress. Cats purr among other cats—for example, when a mother meets her kittens. Until recently, there were many competing theories to explain how cats purr, including vibration of the cat's false vocal cords when inhaling and exhaling, the sound of blood hitting the aorta, vibration of the hyoid apparatus, or resonation directly in the lungs. Currently, though, it is believed that purring is a result of rhythmic impulses to the cat's larynx. They communicate by calling ("meow"/"miaou"), purring, hissing, growling, chirping, clicking, grunting, and about a hundred other vocalizations and body language. Cats in colonies use a mix of vocalizations and body language to communicate with each other It is possible for a cat to call out and purr simultaneously, although this is typical only in very vocal cats. In addition to purring, happy cats may blink slowly or partially close their eyes to break any possible stares and communicate their ease in the situation. However, purring may also be a way for the cat to calm itself down. For example, cats have been known to purr when injured. Although not proven, research has suggested that the frequency of the vibration produced by purring may promote healing of bones and organs in cats, explaining why cats may purr when hurt. Cats are notoriously hygienic animals, grooming themselves with their tongues several times a day. In addition to being a social habit (cats living communally will sometimes groom one another, as well as their human companions), grooming is thought to aid cats in their naturally solitary hunting habits. Unfortunately, the dried residue of cat saliva is an allergic trigger in sensitive individuals, something which can usually be alleviated through medication, by bathing or shaving the cat, or by adopting a breed with shorter fur (such as a Siamese) or little to no hair at all (such as the Cornish Rex or Sphinx.) Cats are seasonally polyestrous, which means they may have many periods of heat over the course of a year. A heat period lasts about 4 to 7 days if the female is bred; if she is not, the heat period lasts longer. The male cat's penis has spines which point backwards. Upon withdrawal of the penis, the spines rake the walls of the female's vagina. The female needs this stimulation for ovulation to begin. Because this does not always occur, females are rarely impregnated by the first male with which they mate. Furthermore, cats are superfecund; that is, a female may mate with more than one male when she is in heat, meaning different kittens in a litter may have different fathers. The reproduction process can be very loud, as both cats vocalize loudly. If one is not used to the sounds of cats mating, it sounds very much like a cat fight. The gestation period for cats is approximately 63-65 days. The size of a litter averages three to five kittens, with the first litter usually smaller than subsequent litters. Kittens are weaned at between six and seven weeks, and cats normally reach sexual maturity at 4-10 months (females) and to 5-7 months (males.)

Cats
Cats








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™