Agriculture
Springing forward
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Polar Bears in Trouble
Color-Changing Bugs
Behavior
Internet Generation
A Recipe for Happiness
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Birds
Cardinals
Dodos
Swifts
Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
The science of disappearing
Sticky Silky Feet
Computers
New eyes to scan the skies
Fingerprint Evidence
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Dinosaurs Grow Up
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Surf Watch
Watering the Air
A Volcano Wakes Up
Environment
Food Web Woes
The Birds are Falling
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
Settling the Americas
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Whale Sharks
Trout
Dogfish
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
The Color of Health
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math Naturals
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Cell Phone Tattlers
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Camel Spiders
Sponges
Dust Mites
Mammals
Kodiak Bear
Siamese Cats
Yaks
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Project Music
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Sweet, Sticky Science
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Pythons
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Cousin Earth
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Watering the Air
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Catching a Comet's Tail

It's been a bumpy ride for the spacecraft known as Stardust. On Jan. 2, the NASA craft got within 240 kilometers of the core of a comet known as Wild 2 (pronounced Vilt 2). The region around the comet's core is a blizzard of dust and debris. As the spacecraft passed through this dusty storm, it felt the impact of particles traveling six times as fast as a rifle bullet. But Stardust's shields held up, and the craft did its job. It scooped up some samples of the dust and took photos of the comet's core. They're the sharpest, most detailed pictures yet taken of a comet, says Donald E. Brownlee of the University of Washington in Seattle. The photos, sent back to Earth by radio, showed that Wild 2 is an unusual comet. First, Wild 2 doesn't have the peanut shape typical of other comets astronomers have observed. It's spherical. Also, Wild 2 is not as smooth as some of its cousins. Instead, its surface is pitted with craterlike hollows. Mike Belton of Tucson, Ariz., thinks this is because Wild 2 hasn't been around the block enough times. In other words, it hasn't made many trips to the inner solar system. When a comet's journey through the solar system brings it closer to the sun, the solar heat turns some of the compounds on the comet's icy surface into vapor. These vaporized substances escape the comet's surface as jets of gas, forcing out other kinds of debris along with them. All this shedding of material changes both the comet's overall shape and the texture of its surface. The peanut-shaped comet Halley has visited the inner solar system more than 1,000 times. It's gone through many episodes of heating and shedding. In contrast, Wild 2 has been in the inner solar system only five times. The more time it spends close to the sun, the more its shape will change. Stardust has now left Wild 2 to begin the 1.14-billion-kilometer journey back to Earth. The craft is expected to arrive, bearing its cargo of comet dust—and probably more than a few dents—in January 2006.—S. McDonagh

Catching a Comet's Tail
Catching a Comet's Tail








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™