Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Toads
Animals
Poor Devils
Cannibal Crickets
Missing Moose
Behavior
Fear Matters
Supersonic Splash
The Disappearing Newspaper
Birds
Crows
Kingfishers
Kiwis
Chemistry and Materials
Lighting goes digital
These gems make their own way
The science of disappearing
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Supersonic Splash
Computers with Attitude
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
A Great Quake Coming?
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Environment
A Stormy History
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
Ancient Cave Behavior
The Taming of the Cat
Fish
Tilapia
Codfish
Marlin
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Food for Life
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Scholarship
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math Naturals
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
A Long Haul
Germ Zapper
Taste Messenger
Invertebrates
Mussels
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Mammals
Cheetah
Rodents
Siberian Husky
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
IceCube Science
Gaining a Swift Lift
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
The algae invasion
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Alligators
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Riding Sunlight
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Robots on a Rocky Road
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Carp

A carp is any of various freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae. The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is the most common and best-known species of carp. Carp have been spread widely and often illegally, and are now present in many countries outside of their natural range. Game and eating fish: Carp are a popular angling and eating fish in many countries. While tasty when grown in good water, carp can be riddled with small bones in unpredictable locations. Most carp have a fishy taste and are not considered to be good for eating in North America, although they are popular in restaurants in Japan and Taiwan where the fish are also considered to be signs of good fortune. Carp is a traditional Christmas Eve dish in the Czech Republic, Germany and Poland. Celebrated in some places: Carp have food and angling value that is celebrated in some parts of the world. The carp has not yet gained gamefish status in the U.S. and are considered garbage among bass fisherman. In Europe on the other hand they are a trophy fish and lake owners are prepared to pay as much as 4,000 or $7,500 dollars for 40lb carp if fisherman fish for them on a catch and release basis. Invasive species: Carp have attributes that allow them to be an invasive species - a species than invades and dominates new ecosystems with serious negative effects to the ecosystem and native fauna. The movement and introduction of Carp for frivolous reasons such as fishing should be not be tolerated. Problems from Carp invaders: Reports of Carp muddying waters and destroying water weed through their bottom-grubbing feeding habits are frequently reported after their introduction, and are often accurate. Such raised turbidity may have serious impacts on aquatic ecosystems and submergent macrophytes ("water weed"), and loss of submergent macrophytes may also have serious effects on fish and invertebrate species reliant on them for habitat. Australian Carp Problems: In Australia, where the dominant Carp strain was illegally introduced in the 1960s, there is overwhelming anecdotal evidence and mounting scientific evidence that Carp do indeed raise water turbidity, destroy a number of submergent macrophyte species, and consequently seriously impact upon aquatic ecosystems and native fish species dependent upon those submergent macrophytes. There is also mounting suspicion that overwhelming numbers of Carp larvae compete with native fish larvae for food.

Carp
Carp








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™