Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Springing forward
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Sea Lilies on the Run
Crocodile Hearts
Hearing Whales
Behavior
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Brainy bees know two from three
The Smell of Trust
Birds
Cardinals
Vultures
Tropical Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Graphene's superstrength
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Life under Ice
Island of Hope
Environment
Sounds and Silence
Little Bits of Trouble
Improving the Camel
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Eels
Bull Sharks
Great White Shark
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Chocolate Rules
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Deep-space dancers
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Foul Play?
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Crawfish
Walking Sticks
Nautiluses
Mammals
Bears
Sea Lions
Black Bear
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
One ring around them all
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Nature's Alphabet
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Crime Lab
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Arctic Melt
Catching Some Rays
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

Carp

A carp is any of various freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae. The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is the most common and best-known species of carp. Carp have been spread widely and often illegally, and are now present in many countries outside of their natural range. Game and eating fish: Carp are a popular angling and eating fish in many countries. While tasty when grown in good water, carp can be riddled with small bones in unpredictable locations. Most carp have a fishy taste and are not considered to be good for eating in North America, although they are popular in restaurants in Japan and Taiwan where the fish are also considered to be signs of good fortune. Carp is a traditional Christmas Eve dish in the Czech Republic, Germany and Poland. Celebrated in some places: Carp have food and angling value that is celebrated in some parts of the world. The carp has not yet gained gamefish status in the U.S. and are considered garbage among bass fisherman. In Europe on the other hand they are a trophy fish and lake owners are prepared to pay as much as 4,000 or $7,500 dollars for 40lb carp if fisherman fish for them on a catch and release basis. Invasive species: Carp have attributes that allow them to be an invasive species - a species than invades and dominates new ecosystems with serious negative effects to the ecosystem and native fauna. The movement and introduction of Carp for frivolous reasons such as fishing should be not be tolerated. Problems from Carp invaders: Reports of Carp muddying waters and destroying water weed through their bottom-grubbing feeding habits are frequently reported after their introduction, and are often accurate. Such raised turbidity may have serious impacts on aquatic ecosystems and submergent macrophytes ("water weed"), and loss of submergent macrophytes may also have serious effects on fish and invertebrate species reliant on them for habitat. Australian Carp Problems: In Australia, where the dominant Carp strain was illegally introduced in the 1960s, there is overwhelming anecdotal evidence and mounting scientific evidence that Carp do indeed raise water turbidity, destroy a number of submergent macrophyte species, and consequently seriously impact upon aquatic ecosystems and native fish species dependent upon those submergent macrophytes. There is also mounting suspicion that overwhelming numbers of Carp larvae compete with native fish larvae for food.

Carp
Carp








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™