Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Insects Take a Breather
A Sense of Danger
Jay Watch
Behavior
Flower family knows its roots
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Birds
Macaws
Mockingbirds
Pigeons
Chemistry and Materials
Small but WISE
A Spider's Silky Strength
Sticky Silky Feet
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
The science of disappearing
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Downsized Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Deep History
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Getting the dirt on carbon
Environment
Alien Invasions
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
If Only Bones Could Speak
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Megamouth Sharks
Seahorses
Lungfish
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Yummy bugs
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Play for Science
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Clams
Worms
Insects
Mammals
Dalmatians
Siamese Cats
Goats
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Springing forward
Making the most of a meal
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Asp
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Shape Shifting
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on the Road, Again
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Earth's Poles in Peril
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Carnivorous Birds

The ducks paddling around and scooping up breadcrumbs are harmless enough, but not all birds are so docile. Carnivorous birds -- often called raptors -- make up a large portion of all bird species. Eagles, hawks, falcons and others are active hunters, eating everything from fish, to rodents, to carrion, to other birds. Identifiable by their sharp beaks and talons (or claws) specially adapted to grasping prey, hunting birds make it easy to see where scientests have drawn a parallel between birds and their ancestors, the dinosaurs. A bird of prey, or raptor, is a bird that hunts its food using its curved beak and talons. They also generally have sexual dimorphism and excellent vision. Nocturnal birds of prey (the owls) are separate from the diurnal families, and are in the order Strigiformes. Although the term "raptor" is sometimes used more broadly, in generally it includes owls, as they too are carnivorous birds, preying on mice and other small animals. Although other groups may fill similar ecological roles and sometimes appear closely related on first sight, this is largely because of convergent evolution. Many terms are used to describe particular types of birds of prey, both by specialists and lay people, in ways that vary a good deal. Eagles are large raptors with long, broad wings and massive legs. Booted eagles have feathered legs and build large stick nests. (Non-specialists often use the term very broadly, to indicate almost any raptor.) Kites are raptors with long wings and weak legs which spend a great deal of time soaring. In general they take live prey but mostly feed on carrion. Falcons are small to medium sized birds of prey with long pointed wings. Unlike most other raptors, they belong to the Falconidae rather than the Accipitridae. Many are particularly swift flyers. Instead of building their own nests, falcons appropriate old nests of other birds. Sometimes they lay their eggs on cliff ledges or in tree hollows. Harriers are large, slender hawk-like birds with long tails and long, thin legs. Most hunt by gliding and circling low over grasslands and marshes on their long, broad wings. Hawks are medium-sized birds of prey that belong to the genus Accipiter. They are mainly woodland birds that hunt by sudden dashes from a concealed perch. They usually have long tails and high visual acuity. Buzzards are wide-ranging raptors with a robust body and broad wings, or, alternatively, any bird of the genus Buteo (also commonly known as Hawks in North America. Other birds are opportunistic omnivores and, although their diet may consist of meat when the meal presents itself (as with roadkill), they are not technically considered strictly carnivorous birds.

Carnivorous Birds
Carnivorous Birds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™