Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Toads
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Red Apes in Danger
Ants on Stilts
Behavior
Baby Talk
Contemplating thought
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Birds
Mockingbirds
Tropical Birds
Robins
Chemistry and Materials
Supergoo to the rescue
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Moon Crash, Splash
Computers
It's a Small E-mail World After All
New twists for phantom limbs
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Feathered Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
A Dire Shortage of Water
Environment
Little Bits of Trouble
The Wolf and the Cow
Acid Snails
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Early Maya Writing
Words of the Distant Past
Fish
Lampreys
Pygmy Sharks
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Packing Fat
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Flatworms
Starfish
Dragonflies
Mammals
Dingoes
Beagles
Bulldogs
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Electric Backpack
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
One ring around them all
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Farms sprout in cities
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Reptiles
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Killers from Outer Space
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Revving Up Green Machines
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

Box Turtles

The Box turtle is one of several species of turtles. They are largely characterized by a domed shell, but the two genera are otherwise very different in habitat, behavior and appearance, and, as such, are not even classified in the same family. A Hinge-shelled Turtle: The Eastern Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) is a subspecies within a group of hinge-shelled turtles, normally called Box turtles. T. c. carolina is native to an eastern part of the United States. Occasionally, it is referred to as the Common Box Turtle to distinguish it from the other five subspecies of Eastern box turtles. Shell of Many Colors: Eastern box turtles have a high, dome-like shell and a hinged plastron that allows total shell closure. The carapace can be of variable coloration, but is normally found brownish or black and is accompanied by a yellowish or orangish radiating pattern of lines, spots or blotches. Skin coloration, like that of the shell, is variable, but is usually brown with some yellow, orange, or white spots or streaks. The color of the shell and skin of an Eastern box turtle differs with age; younger turtles of the type are often more vibrantly colored than the older. Furthermore, males normally possess red eyes (irises) as females display brown eyes more often than not. Eastern box turtles feature a horny beak, chubby limbs, and their feet are webbed only at the base. Weights and Measures: Staying small in size, males grow to up to 7", and females to about 8". In the wild, box turtles are known to live over 80 years, but in captivity, usually live only between 30-50. Where in the World? The Eastern box turtle is found mainly in the eastern United States, as is implied by its name. They are populated as far north as southern Maine and the northwest of the Michigan Lower Peninsula, south to southern Florida and west to eastern Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. The Eastern box turtle is considered uncommon to rare in the Great Lakes region; however, populations can be found in areas not bisected by heavily traveled roads. In the Midwest, they are a species of Special Interest in Ohio, and of Special Concern in Michigan. Eastern box turtles prefer deciduous or mixed forested regions, with a moderately moist forest floor that has good drainage. They can be also found in open grasslands, or pastures. On the Menu: The eating habits of Eastern box turtles vary greatly due to individual taste, temperature, lighting, and their surrounding environment. As is different from warm-blooded animals, their metabolism doesn't force their eating, rather they can just lessen their activity level, retreat into their shells and halt their food intake until better conditions arise. Not Picky: There are a variety of foods which are universally accepted by Eastern box turtles, which include earthworms, snails, grubs, beetles, caterpillars, grasses, fallen fruit, berries, mushrooms, flowers, and carrion. Many times, they will eat an item of food, especially in captivity, just because it looks and smells edible, such as hamburger or eggs. Pets on Plates: Thousands of box turtles are collected from the wild every year for the exotic pet trade, and some are even shipped to Asia for the food market. Captive breeding is fairly commonplace, but not so much that it can supply the market demand. Box turtles can make hardy captives if their needs are met, and are frequently kept as pets. They are also well represented in many zoos throughout the world.

Box Turtles
Box Turtles








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™