Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Microbes at the Gas Pump
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Animals
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Monkey Math
Behavior
Dino-bite!
Slumber by the numbers
Taking a Spill for Science
Birds
Ibises
Pigeons
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Sugary Survival Skill
Music of the Future
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Digging Dinos
Fingerprinting Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Wave of Destruction
What is groundwater
Environment
Whale Watch
Blooming Jellies
Giant snakes invading North America
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
Sahara Cemetery
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Puffer Fish
Skates
Hagfish
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
The mercury in that tuna
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
It's a Math World for Animals
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Spit Power
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Spiders
Hermit Crabs
Walking Sticks
Mammals
Beagles
Numbats
Primates
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Children and Media
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Gaining a Swift Lift
Electric Backpack
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Fungus Hunt
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Crocodiles
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
A Great Ball of Fire
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
A Planet from the Early Universe
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Shape Shifting
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Ready, unplug, drive
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Birds We Eat

Birds have always been an important food source for man. In addition to domestic species that provide us with eggs, there are still other species that are hunted in the wild for sport and for food. Some are quite common, like chicken and turkey, while others appeal to slightly more exotic tastes, like duck or pheasant. Birds are an important food source for humans. The most commonly eaten species is the domestic chicken and its eggs, although geese, pheasants, turkeys, and ducks are also widely eaten. Other birds that have been utilized for food include emus, ostriches, pigeons, grouse, quails, doves, woodcocks, songbirds, and others, including small passerines such as finches. Birds grown for human consumption are referred to as Poultry. At one time swans and flamingos were delicacies of the rich and powerful, although these are generally protected now. Many species have become extinct through over-hunting, such as the Passenger Pigeon, and many others have become endangered or extinct through habitat destruction, deforestation and intensive agriculture being common causes for declines. Birds such as chickens and turkeys are regularly farm-raised for slaughter and commercial sale, although in the early days of farming and domestication, the poultry population was carefully monitored. A human family depended upon eggs and fowl not just as a staple of their daily diet (both for meat and eggs), but for their feathers (to fill mattresses and pillows) and for trade of the same with other farmers and settlers. Although we rely on birds as food just as much today, commercial farmers raise the birds in far greater numbers than was once possible, and finding eggs or poultry is never any further than the closest grocery store.

Birds We Eat
Birds We Eat








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