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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
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Sting Ray
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Packing Fat
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math is a real brain bender
Math of the World
Human Body
Spit Power
Hey batter, wake up!
Taste Messenger
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Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
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Dreams of Floating in Space
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
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A Change in Leaf Color
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Copperhead Snakes
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Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
A Moon's Icy Spray
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
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Crime Lab
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
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Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
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Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Science loses out when ice caps melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Bionic Bacteria

Sometimes inanimate objects appear to act as if they're alive. Doors suddenly slam shut on their own, lights flicker on and off, or refrigerators gurgle and gasp. It's the spooky stuff of science fiction and horror movies. Get used to the idea. Living gadgets may be on their way. Two chemical engineers from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln have turned simple bacteria into electrical devices that measure humidity. The craziest part of all is that the bacteria must be alive for the gadgets to work at first. After they get going, the sensors work even when the tiny microbes die. To build the devices, the researchers started with a basic electrical device called a silicon chip. The chip contained gold electrodes, which are good at conducting electricity. Next, the engineers grew a coating of a type of bacteria called Bacillus cereus. These microbes grouped together and formed bridges between the electrodes. Finally, the researchers dipped the chips into a solution that contained minuscule gold beads with a coating that made them stick to the bacteria. To test their living sensors, the researchers passed electricity through the gold beads on the backs of the microbes that formed bridges. When humidity drops (which means that moisture levels in the air go down), the bacteria shrink. The distance between beads then decreases, so more electricity flows. This humidity detector is extremely sensitive. Lowering humidity from 20 percent to zero causes 40 times as much electricity to flow across the bridge. Now that researchers have figured out how to make a sensor out of living bacteria, they have set their sights on other devices. In the future, they hope to hitch microbes to electronic devices so that feeding these tiny captives results in a flow of electricity from the critters into the devices. Maybe microbe-powered batteries will someday run the really tiny iPods that your kids will use.—E. Sohn

Bionic Bacteria
Bionic Bacteria








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