Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Cool Penguins
The Littlest Lemurs
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Behavior
Swine flu goes global
Fear Matters
Double take
Birds
Waterfowl
Swans
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
The science of disappearing
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Salt secrets
Computers
Music of the Future
Games with a Purpose
A Light Delay
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Battling Mastodons
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Earth from the inside out
Springing forward
Environment
Plastic Meals for Seals
Bald Eagles Forever
Plant Gas
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Decoding a Beverage Jar
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Saltwater Fish
Skates and Rays
Sturgeons
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Yummy bugs
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Gut Microbes and Weight
A Fix for Injured Knees
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Lobsters
Leeches
Mammals
Baboons
Skunks
Hares
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Seeds of the Future
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Caimans
Komodo Dragons
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on a Rocky Road
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
A Change in Climate
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Bionic Bacteria

Sometimes inanimate objects appear to act as if they're alive. Doors suddenly slam shut on their own, lights flicker on and off, or refrigerators gurgle and gasp. It's the spooky stuff of science fiction and horror movies. Get used to the idea. Living gadgets may be on their way. Two chemical engineers from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln have turned simple bacteria into electrical devices that measure humidity. The craziest part of all is that the bacteria must be alive for the gadgets to work at first. After they get going, the sensors work even when the tiny microbes die. To build the devices, the researchers started with a basic electrical device called a silicon chip. The chip contained gold electrodes, which are good at conducting electricity. Next, the engineers grew a coating of a type of bacteria called Bacillus cereus. These microbes grouped together and formed bridges between the electrodes. Finally, the researchers dipped the chips into a solution that contained minuscule gold beads with a coating that made them stick to the bacteria. To test their living sensors, the researchers passed electricity through the gold beads on the backs of the microbes that formed bridges. When humidity drops (which means that moisture levels in the air go down), the bacteria shrink. The distance between beads then decreases, so more electricity flows. This humidity detector is extremely sensitive. Lowering humidity from 20 percent to zero causes 40 times as much electricity to flow across the bridge. Now that researchers have figured out how to make a sensor out of living bacteria, they have set their sights on other devices. In the future, they hope to hitch microbes to electronic devices so that feeding these tiny captives results in a flow of electricity from the critters into the devices. Maybe microbe-powered batteries will someday run the really tiny iPods that your kids will use.E. Sohn

Bionic Bacteria
Bionic Bacteria








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™