Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Toads
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
Lives of a Mole Rat
Gliders in the Family
Behavior
Dino-bite!
How Much Babies Know
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Birds
Dodos
Peafowl
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
A Spider's Silky Strength
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
A Light Delay
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Battling Mastodons
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Watering the Air
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Early Maya Writing
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Whale Sharks
Piranha
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Strong Bones for Life
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Hey batter, wake up!
Germ Zapper
Foul Play?
Invertebrates
Ticks
Dragonflies
Octopuses
Mammals
Asiatic Bears
Bulldogs
Grizzly Bear
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Speedy stars
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Tortoises
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Troubles with Hubble
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Science loses out when ice caps melt
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Bionic Bacteria

Sometimes inanimate objects appear to act as if they're alive. Doors suddenly slam shut on their own, lights flicker on and off, or refrigerators gurgle and gasp. It's the spooky stuff of science fiction and horror movies. Get used to the idea. Living gadgets may be on their way. Two chemical engineers from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln have turned simple bacteria into electrical devices that measure humidity. The craziest part of all is that the bacteria must be alive for the gadgets to work at first. After they get going, the sensors work even when the tiny microbes die. To build the devices, the researchers started with a basic electrical device called a silicon chip. The chip contained gold electrodes, which are good at conducting electricity. Next, the engineers grew a coating of a type of bacteria called Bacillus cereus. These microbes grouped together and formed bridges between the electrodes. Finally, the researchers dipped the chips into a solution that contained minuscule gold beads with a coating that made them stick to the bacteria. To test their living sensors, the researchers passed electricity through the gold beads on the backs of the microbes that formed bridges. When humidity drops (which means that moisture levels in the air go down), the bacteria shrink. The distance between beads then decreases, so more electricity flows. This humidity detector is extremely sensitive. Lowering humidity from 20 percent to zero causes 40 times as much electricity to flow across the bridge. Now that researchers have figured out how to make a sensor out of living bacteria, they have set their sights on other devices. In the future, they hope to hitch microbes to electronic devices so that feeding these tiny captives results in a flow of electricity from the critters into the devices. Maybe microbe-powered batteries will someday run the really tiny iPods that your kids will use.E. Sohn

Bionic Bacteria
Bionic Bacteria








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™