Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Animals
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Thieves of a Feather
Copybees
Behavior
Math is a real brain bender
Ear pain, weight gain
Reading Body Language
Birds
Woodpecker
Waterfowl
Peafowl
Chemistry and Materials
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Batteries built by Viruses
Hair Detectives
Computers
The solar system's biggest junkyard
The Book of Life
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Ancient Heights
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Environment
Bald Eagles Forever
The Oily Gulf
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Chicken of the Sea
Writing on eggshells
Fish
Pygmy Sharks
Dogfish
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Sponges' secret weapon
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Cockroaches
Camel Spiders
Leeches
Mammals
Beagles
Domestic Shorthairs
Aardvarks
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
How children learn
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Road Bumps
Plants
Underwater Jungles
A Giant Flower's New Family
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Alligators
Asp
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Roving the Red Planet
Cousin Earth
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Young Scientists Take Flight
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on a Rocky Road
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Warmest Year on Record
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. And packages and letters will carry electronic tags that send messages about where they are. To make such a world possible, scientists are working on a technology called radiofrequency identification (RFID). An RFID tag is an electronic device that can be glued to cereal boxes, milk cartons, envelopes, and other objects. The tags store information and use radio signals to communicate with computers or sensors. RFID tags already exist in the form of "smart cards" that store dollar amounts for riders of some public transportation systems. RFID chips have also been implanted in animals to identify them and allow owners to find them if the animals get lost. In these cases, the tags are made of silicon, the material from which most computer chips are made. However, silicon electronic tags are too expensive to be used as widely as printed bar codes are. Now, scientists from two companies in Europe have independently taken steps toward speeding up the spread of RFID technology. They have created tags completely out of plastic materials with the right kinds of electronic properties to transmit radio signals efficiently. The methods for making plastic tags are much cheaper than those for making silicon tags. The tags produced by scientists from Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven in the Netherlands are made from a type of plastic called pentacene and transmit radio waves at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz. The tags produced by PolyIC in Erlangen, Germany, use a different type of plastic. Neither type of tag is perfect yet. The plastic tags are still expensive and tricky to manufacture, and their radio signals don't travel very far. It may be a few years yet before plastic RFIDs make their way into nearly all of our everyday objects. But when they do, there will be an amazing amount of information zooming invisibly around us.E. Sohn

Beyond Bar Codes
Beyond Bar Codes








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