Agriculture
Springing forward
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Seabird's Endless Summer
Sleepless at Sea
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Behavior
The Smell of Trust
The nerve of one animal
Double take
Birds
Parakeets
Rheas
Kookaburras
Chemistry and Materials
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Salt secrets
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
Games with a Purpose
The Shape of the Internet
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Digging for Ancient DNA
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Quick Quake Alerts
Environment
Food Web Woes
Indoor ozone stopper
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Lampreys
Swordfish
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Food for Life
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math Naturals
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Flu Patrol
Invertebrates
Termites
Scorpions
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Walrus
Poodles
Mongooses
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
The Particle Zoo
IceCube Science
Plants
Springing forward
Assembling the Tree of Life
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Chameleons
Asp
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Young Scientists Take Flight
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Arctic Melt
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. And packages and letters will carry electronic tags that send messages about where they are. To make such a world possible, scientists are working on a technology called radiofrequency identification (RFID). An RFID tag is an electronic device that can be glued to cereal boxes, milk cartons, envelopes, and other objects. The tags store information and use radio signals to communicate with computers or sensors. RFID tags already exist in the form of "smart cards" that store dollar amounts for riders of some public transportation systems. RFID chips have also been implanted in animals to identify them and allow owners to find them if the animals get lost. In these cases, the tags are made of silicon, the material from which most computer chips are made. However, silicon electronic tags are too expensive to be used as widely as printed bar codes are. Now, scientists from two companies in Europe have independently taken steps toward speeding up the spread of RFID technology. They have created tags completely out of plastic materials with the right kinds of electronic properties to transmit radio signals efficiently. The methods for making plastic tags are much cheaper than those for making silicon tags. The tags produced by scientists from Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven in the Netherlands are made from a type of plastic called pentacene and transmit radio waves at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz. The tags produced by PolyIC in Erlangen, Germany, use a different type of plastic. Neither type of tag is perfect yet. The plastic tags are still expensive and tricky to manufacture, and their radio signals don't travel very far. It may be a few years yet before plastic RFIDs make their way into nearly all of our everyday objects. But when they do, there will be an amazing amount of information zooming invisibly around us.—E. Sohn

Beyond Bar Codes
Beyond Bar Codes








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