Agriculture
Watering the Air
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Fishy Cleaners
Chicken Talk
Behavior
Monkeys in the Mirror
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Birds
Ibises
Birds We Eat
Songbirds
Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
Bandages that could bite back
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Computers
Troubles with Hubble
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Fingerprinting Fossils
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Petrified Lightning
Deep History
Environment
A Change in Leaf Color
Fungus Hunt
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
A Long Haul
The Taming of the Cat
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Trout
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Chocolate Rules
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Detecting True Art
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Cell Phone Tattlers
Foul Play?
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Scorpions
Nautiluses
Mammals
Oxen
Asiatic Bears
African Gorillas
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Physics
IceCube Science
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
One ring around them all
Plants
Springing forward
Fungus Hunt
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Box Turtles
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
An Earthlike Planet
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Supersuits for Superheroes
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
How to Fly Like a Bat
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
A Change in Climate
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. And packages and letters will carry electronic tags that send messages about where they are. To make such a world possible, scientists are working on a technology called radiofrequency identification (RFID). An RFID tag is an electronic device that can be glued to cereal boxes, milk cartons, envelopes, and other objects. The tags store information and use radio signals to communicate with computers or sensors. RFID tags already exist in the form of "smart cards" that store dollar amounts for riders of some public transportation systems. RFID chips have also been implanted in animals to identify them and allow owners to find them if the animals get lost. In these cases, the tags are made of silicon, the material from which most computer chips are made. However, silicon electronic tags are too expensive to be used as widely as printed bar codes are. Now, scientists from two companies in Europe have independently taken steps toward speeding up the spread of RFID technology. They have created tags completely out of plastic materials with the right kinds of electronic properties to transmit radio signals efficiently. The methods for making plastic tags are much cheaper than those for making silicon tags. The tags produced by scientists from Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven in the Netherlands are made from a type of plastic called pentacene and transmit radio waves at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz. The tags produced by PolyIC in Erlangen, Germany, use a different type of plastic. Neither type of tag is perfect yet. The plastic tags are still expensive and tricky to manufacture, and their radio signals don't travel very far. It may be a few years yet before plastic RFIDs make their way into nearly all of our everyday objects. But when they do, there will be an amazing amount of information zooming invisibly around us.—E. Sohn

Beyond Bar Codes
Beyond Bar Codes








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