Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Got Milk? How?
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Fishy Sounds
Monkeys Count
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Behavior
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Longer lives for wild elephants
Fighting fat with fat
Birds
Ospreys
Quails
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Graphene's superstrength
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Great Quake Coming?
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
A Volcano Wakes Up
Environment
A Stormy History
Shrinking Fish
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Finding the Past
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Childhood's Long History
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Parrotfish
Hagfish
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Yummy bugs
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Prime Time for Cicadas
Play for Science
Human Body
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Walking to Exercise the Brain
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Walking Sticks
Bees
Mammals
Oxen
African Wildedbeest
Seal
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Physics
Road Bumps
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Electric Backpack
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Underwater Jungles
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Turtles
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Crime Lab
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Revving Up Green Machines
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Basking Sharks

The Basking Shark (Cetorhinus maximus), also known as the Bone Shark, is the second largest fish alive, after the Whale Shark. A cosmopolitan species, Basking Sharks are found in all the world's temperate oceans. Sizes and Scales: Reported to reach a weight of six tonnes and maximum length of 15.2 metres (50 feet), but most often recorded at up to four tons and 9.8 metres (32 feet), Basking Sharks are one of the classic "sea monsters" of old. Not Just a Pretty Face: These sharks have been mistaken for Great White Sharks: the two species can be easily distinguished, however, by the Basking's cavernous maw (up to a metre in width, held wide open whilst feeding), longer and more obvious gill slits (which nearly circle the entire head and are accompanied by well-developed gill rakers), smaller eyes, and usually smaller girth. Telling Teeth: Also, Great Whites possess large, dagger-like teeth, whilst those of the Basking Shark are greatly reduced (5-6 mm) and hooked; only the first 3-4 rows of the upper jaw and 6-7 rows of the lower are functional. Basking in the Sun: Basking sharks are so named for their apparent basking behavior while feeding. They are most often seen while basking at the surface with their mouths open. Filter Feeders: The Basking shark is a filter feeder eating plankton from the water with its wide, gaping mouth. Unlike the Megamouth Shark and Whale Shark, Basking Sharks do not appear to actively seek their quarry, but do possess large olfactory bulbs that may point the sharks in the right direction. Birds and the Bees: Basking Sharks are ovoviviparous: the developing embryos first rely on a yolk sac, and as there is no placental connection, they later rely on unfertilized ova produced by the mother (a behaviour known as oophagy). Gestation is thought to span over a year (but perhaps much longer), with a small and unknown number of young born fully developed at 1.5-2 metres (5-6.5 feet) in length. Mating is thought to occur in early summer and birthing in late summer, following the female's movement into shallow coastal waters. The onset of maturity in Basking Sharks is not known with certainty but is thought to be between the 6-13th year of life and at a length of between 4.6-6 metres. Breeding frequency is also unknown, but is thought to be 2-4 years. Useless Teeth: The seemingly useless teeth of Basking Sharks may play a role in courtship behaviour, possibly as a means for the male to keep hold of the female during mating.

Basking Sharks
Basking Sharks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™