Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Getting the dirt on carbon
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Toads
Animals
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
A Wild Ferret Rise
Insect Stowaways
Behavior
Listen and Learn
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Dino-bite!
Birds
Parakeets
Pelicans
Macaws
Chemistry and Materials
Graphene's superstrength
Moon Crash, Splash
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Computers
Middle school science adventures
Play for Science
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Hall of Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Riding to Earth's Core
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Environment
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The Wolf and the Cow
Improving the Camel
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Your inner Neandertal
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Hagfish
Tilapia
Swordfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Building a Food Pyramid
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Foul Play?
Flu Patrol
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Invertebrates
Centipedes
Mollusks
Sea Urchin
Mammals
Caribou
Spectacled Bear
Deers
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Dreams of Floating in Space
Project Music
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Anacondas
Asp
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Sounds of Titan
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Crime Lab
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Flying the Hyper Skies
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Bandicoot

A bandicoot is any of about 20 species of small to medium-sized, terrestrial marsupial omnivores in the order Peramelemorphia. The word bandicoot is an anglicised form of the Telugu word pandhi-kokku, (loosely, pig-dog) which originally referred to the unrelated Indian Bandicoot Rat. The other two species of peramelemorphs are the bilbies. Who, What, Where, When: Bilbies are marsupial omnivores; they are members of the Peramelemorphia biological order and the largest of the bandicoots. Before European colonization of Australia there were two species. One became extinct in the 1950s, the other survives but remains endangered. Just the Facts: Bilbies have the characteristic long bandicoot muzzle and very long ears. As compared with other bandicoots, they have a longer tail, bigger ears, and softer, silky fur. "Sorry, I don't drink..." They are nocturnal omnivores that do not need to drink water, as they get all the moisture they need from their food, which includes insects and their larvae, seeds, spiders, bulbs, fruit, fungi and very small animals. Most food is found by digging or scratching in the soil, and using their very long tongues. Master Architects: They are excellent burrowers and build extensive tunnel systems with their strong forelimbs and well-developed claws. A bilby typically makes a number of burrows within its home range, up to about a dozen, and moves between them, using them for shelter both from predators and the heat of the day. Unusual Marsupial: The embryos of bandicoots, unlike other marsupials, form a placenta-like organ that connects it to the uterine wall. The function of this organ is probably to transfer nutrients from the mother; however the structure is small compared to those of the placentalia. Classification Confusion: Classification within the Peramelemorphia used to be simple: there were thought to be two families in the order — the short-legged and mostly herbivorous bandicoots, and the longer-legged, more nearly carnivorous bilbies. In recent years, however, it has become clear that the situation is more complex. First, the bandicoots of the New Guinean and far-northern Australian rainforests were deemed distinct from all other bandicoots, and these were grouped together in the separate family Peroryctidae. More recently, the bandicoot families were reunited in Peramelidae, with the New Guinean species split into four genera in two subfamilies, Peroryctinae and Echymiperinae, while the "true bandicoots" occupy the subfamily Peramelinae. The only exception is the extinct Pig-footed Bandicoot, which has been given its own family, Chaeropodidae.

Bandicoot
Bandicoot








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™