Agriculture
Springing forward
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Toads
Newts
Animals
Little Bee Brains That Could
Sea Lilies on the Run
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Behavior
Internet Generation
Worldís largest lizard is venomous too
Listening to Birdsong
Birds
Roadrunners
Birds We Eat
Hummingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Earth from the inside out
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Supersonic Splash
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Deep Drilling at Sea
Rocking the House
Life trapped under a glacier
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
The Wolf and the Cow
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
A Big Discovery about Little People
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
Seahorses
Freshwater Fish
Tilapia
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Strong Bones for Life
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Setting a Prime Number Record
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Germ Zapper
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Krill
Octopuses
Walking Sticks
Mammals
Caribou
Persian Cats
Yorkshire Terriers
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
IceCube Science
Electric Backpack
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Lizards
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
Catching a Comet's Tail
A Planet from the Early Universe
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Middle school science adventures
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Bandages that could bite back

The human body has a natural block to keep out bacteria that would cause infections: skin. But when the skin gets burned, itís not only painful, itís bad for the body. Burned skin cannot keep the bacteria out, so infections are common. Thatís why doctors who treat burn victims have to look out for the slightest sign of dangerous infection. Doctors often wrap burns in bandages for protection, but a recent study shows that a new kind of bandage can actually fight infection. Better yet, this new bandage can use the harmful bacteria against themselves ó in other words, the infection-causing organisms cause their own deaths. Toby Jenkins, a scientist at the University of Bath in England, worked on the study. Jenkins and his colleagues developed a material that contains tiny capsules. But these carefully designed packets arenít what they seem: To a bacterium, these capsules look like cells just waiting to be invaded. What the little invaders donít know, however, is that the capsules contain antibiotics, which are chemical compounds that can kill bacteria on contact. The bacteria attack the cells by releasing toxins, or poisons. But when the bacteria attack the capsules, the capsules fight back ó by releasing antibiotics that knock out any nearby bacteria. Itís an unusual idea ó using bacteria against themselves. Jenkins and the other scientists tested the material on two types of harmful bacteria. One was a type of Staphylococcus bacteria; the other was a type of Pseudomonas bacteria. When researchers placed scraps of the new material in a Petri dish with the bacteria, the bacteria barely grew at all, which is unusual. This observation led the researchers to believe that the bacteria had attacked the fabric, and that the antibiotics had been released ó which kept the bacteria from growing. The scientists want the bandages to work specifically against dangerous bacteria, so they also tested the fabric on a harmless type of E. coli bacteria. When the scrap of fabric was placed in a Petri dish with E. coli, the bacteria grew quickly ó showing that the trap didnít fool the harmless bacteria. The harmful bacteria probably released toxins that burst the capsules open, while the harmless E. coli left the capsules alone. This early experiment shows that the material can selectively kill dangerous bacteria, but itís too early to start using the material in hospitals. ďThis is a nice approach and theyíve shown in principle that it works,Ē Christopher Batich, a biomedical engineer at the University of Florida in Gainesville, told Science News. Batich did not work on the study. While heís excited about the results, he added that the real world is more complicated than this experiment. ďYouíd have to work with real bacteria and real wounds to see if it makes a difference,Ē he says. Jenkins and his colleagues are back at work improving the healing fabric. In the not-so-distant future, this kind of antibacterial bandage may move from the laboratory to the hospital bed ó and give burn victims a fighting chance against infection.

Bandages that could bite back
Bandages that could bite back








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™