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Bandages that could bite back

The human body has a natural block to keep out bacteria that would cause infections: skin. But when the skin gets burned, itís not only painful, itís bad for the body. Burned skin cannot keep the bacteria out, so infections are common. Thatís why doctors who treat burn victims have to look out for the slightest sign of dangerous infection. Doctors often wrap burns in bandages for protection, but a recent study shows that a new kind of bandage can actually fight infection. Better yet, this new bandage can use the harmful bacteria against themselves ó in other words, the infection-causing organisms cause their own deaths. Toby Jenkins, a scientist at the University of Bath in England, worked on the study. Jenkins and his colleagues developed a material that contains tiny capsules. But these carefully designed packets arenít what they seem: To a bacterium, these capsules look like cells just waiting to be invaded. What the little invaders donít know, however, is that the capsules contain antibiotics, which are chemical compounds that can kill bacteria on contact. The bacteria attack the cells by releasing toxins, or poisons. But when the bacteria attack the capsules, the capsules fight back ó by releasing antibiotics that knock out any nearby bacteria. Itís an unusual idea ó using bacteria against themselves. Jenkins and the other scientists tested the material on two types of harmful bacteria. One was a type of Staphylococcus bacteria; the other was a type of Pseudomonas bacteria. When researchers placed scraps of the new material in a Petri dish with the bacteria, the bacteria barely grew at all, which is unusual. This observation led the researchers to believe that the bacteria had attacked the fabric, and that the antibiotics had been released ó which kept the bacteria from growing. The scientists want the bandages to work specifically against dangerous bacteria, so they also tested the fabric on a harmless type of E. coli bacteria. When the scrap of fabric was placed in a Petri dish with E. coli, the bacteria grew quickly ó showing that the trap didnít fool the harmless bacteria. The harmful bacteria probably released toxins that burst the capsules open, while the harmless E. coli left the capsules alone. This early experiment shows that the material can selectively kill dangerous bacteria, but itís too early to start using the material in hospitals. ďThis is a nice approach and theyíve shown in principle that it works,Ē Christopher Batich, a biomedical engineer at the University of Florida in Gainesville, told Science News. Batich did not work on the study. While heís excited about the results, he added that the real world is more complicated than this experiment. ďYouíd have to work with real bacteria and real wounds to see if it makes a difference,Ē he says. Jenkins and his colleagues are back at work improving the healing fabric. In the not-so-distant future, this kind of antibacterial bandage may move from the laboratory to the hospital bed ó and give burn victims a fighting chance against infection.

Bandages that could bite back
Bandages that could bite back








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