Agriculture
Springing forward
Watering the Air
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Toads
Animals
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Roach Love Songs
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Wired for Math
Longer lives for wild elephants
Birds
Owls
Rheas
Falcons
Chemistry and Materials
Popping to Perfection
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Makeup Science
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
New twists for phantom limbs
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet your mysterious relative
Mini T. rex
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Ready, unplug, drive
Saving Wetlands
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Childhood's Long History
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Whale Sharks
Manta Rays
Bull Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
The Color of Health
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Squid
Scallops
Giant Squid
Mammals
Dachshunds
Prairie Dogs
African Elephants
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
One ring around them all
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Bright Blooms That Glow
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Geckos
Garter Snakes
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Lost and Found
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Toy Challenge
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Revving Up Green Machines
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Baby Talk

Kids are far better than adults at learning how to speak multiple languages. Research now shows that very young infants might have some of the best language skills of all.A new study suggests that babies between 4 and 6 months old can tell the difference between two languages just by looking at the speaker's face. They don't need to hear a word. Sometime between 6 and 8 months of age, babies raised in homes where just one language is spoken lose this ability. Babies from bilingual homes, on the other hand, keep the face-reading ability until they're at least 8 months old. Researchers in Canada, at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, studied 36 infants from English-speaking families. Twelve of the babies were 4 months old, 12 were 6 months old, and the rest were 8 months old. Each baby sat on his or her mother's lap and watched video clips of a woman talking. The woman was fluent in both English and French. In some clips, she read from a storybook in English. In other clips, she read in French. In all of the videos, there was no sound. After watching clip after clip of the woman reading in just one language, the babies eventually started to look away, apparently because they were bored. The researchers then showed the babies a new silent clip of the woman reading a story in the other language. At that point, the 4- and 6-month olds started looking at the screen again. The 8-month olds, by contrast, paid no attention. The second study involved a different set of 36 infants of the same ages. These babies were from English-speaking homes. They watched silent clips of the woman reading one set of sentences in either English or French until they grew bored. Then, they saw clips showing the woman read different sentences, but in the same language that she had already been speaking. None of the babies showed a renewed interest. A third trial included 24 infants of the same ages whose families spoke both English and French at home. In the first set of clips, the woman spoke in one language, and in the second set she used the other language. All babies in this study looked longer at clips after the woman switched languages. That suggests that, in bilingual families, a baby's ability to distinguish between languages persists at least until eight months of age. Together, these results suggest that "visual information about speech may play a more critical role [in language learning] than previously anticipated," says lead researcher and psychologist Whitney M. Weikum. It's not yet clear, she adds, which part of the speaker's face babies are looking at for clues. Next, scientists want to see whether babies can match faces with the voices of foreign-language speakers. If babies can do this, the scientists would then like to know if this ability also declines toward the end of the first year of life.—Emily Sohn

Baby Talk
Baby Talk








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™