Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Animals
Fishy Cleaners
Vent Worms Like It Hot
From Chimps to People
Behavior
Night of the living ants
Puberty gone wild
Lightening Your Mood
Birds
Kiwis
Emus
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Music of the Future
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Ferocious Growth Spurts
A Living Fossil
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Greener Diet
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Environment
Island Extinctions
Inspired by Nature
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Writing on eggshells
Untangling Human Origins
The Taming of the Cat
Fish
Tuna
Lampreys
Hammerhead Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
The mercury in that tuna
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Invertebrates
Camel Spiders
Fleas
Caterpillars
Mammals
Labradors
Great Danes
Marmots
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Road Bumps
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Assembling the Tree of Life
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Boa Constrictors
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
No Fat Stars
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Revving Up Green Machines
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A Change in Climate
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Awake at Night

The less sleep I get, the unhappier I become. When I'm really tired, I have trouble concentrating. I can't get any work done. I get cranky and irritable, and everything starts to annoy me. I know lots of people just like me, but I also have friends who can stay up all night and still seem chipper the next day. How well do you fare after a slumber-less sleepover? Scientists have been studying sleep for decades, but they still know very little about the genes involved. Genes are stretches of DNA found within every cell. They direct all sorts of processes in the body. Sleep researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison decided to focus on certain fruit flies (called Drosophila melanogaster) because their genes are easy to study and similar to ours. Fruit flies also sleep a lot, typically 9 to 15 hours a day. A sleeping fly looks like it's just sitting still. You can't hear the snores. The researchers collected more than 9,000 groups of fruit flies. Each group had a different set of genes. The scientists then observed several flies of each type to see how many hours a day the insects slept and how they behaved after being kept awake for 24 hours. One group of flies proved to be the most interesting. Named minisleep flies, they slept only 4 to 5 hours a day. Even after 24 hours without sleep, they did just as well on reaction tests as rested flies did. Normal sleep-deprived flies were much slower to react. After a series of tests, the scientists discovered one mutation in a single gene in the minisleep flies. As a result, these flies have nerves that appear to get excited easily. It's possible that people who don't need much sleep have a similar mutation. In every other way, minisleep flies seemed normal—except one. Most fruit flies live for about 3 or 4 months. The minisleepers lived about 2 weeks less. So, even if you feel fine on little sleep, the researchers say, skimping on sleep might affect your health in other ways. Knowing that, I'm going to make sure to sleep in tomorrow. If nothing else, I'll be a lot more pleasant to be around.—E. Sohn

Awake at Night
Awake at Night








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™