Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Bee Disease
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Making Sense of Scents
Birds
Flightless Birds
Storks
Pigeons
Chemistry and Materials
A Light Delay
Heaviest named element is official
The Taste of Bubbles
Computers
Computers with Attitude
Middle school science adventures
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Flower family knows its roots
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Wave of Destruction
Environment
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fish
Flounder
Eels
Tiger Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Yummy bugs
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. Whom
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
Prime Time for Cicadas
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Heart Revival
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Roundworms
Snails
Mammals
Canines
Pitbulls
Grizzly Bear
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Project Music
IceCube Science
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Sweet, Sticky Science
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Lizards
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Riding Sunlight
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Robots on the Road, Again
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Atom Hauler

Atoms are everywhere, but you'd never know it. Even though these tiny building blocks of matter make up everything—from chairs to air—they're far too tiny to see with your own eyes. When scientists want to study atoms one at a time, however, they can use special, highly sensitive microscopes to see them. Using these tools, called scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs), researchers can also move individual atoms around. Now, researchers in France and Germany have taken the technology one step further. They have found a way to gather up and move around atoms in bunches. Their work may help them eventually make and operate tiny, nanoscale machines.The key part of a scanning tunneling microscope is an extremely sharp needle that rides over the surface being examined. This sharp tip can even nudge a single atom from one place to another. But maneuvering more than one atom at a time is a difficult juggling act. To make the task easier, the researchers created a new, six-legged molecule. They called it hexa-t-butyl-hexaphenylbenzene (HB-HBP). The molecule is shaped like a hexagon (having six sides) and contains rings of carbon atoms. Six tripodlike feet support the structure. Like a minuscule vacuum cleaner, it can easily slide over a copper surface, sucking up loose copper atoms. Experiments performed at very low temperatures and in practically airless conditions showed that an STM tip can move an HB-HBP molecule that holds as many as five copper atoms that the molecule has picked up. Scientists can then use the STM tip to lift the carrier molecule, leaving the clump of atoms behind. The development is a major step toward making molecule-sized machines, scientists say. Someday, tiny sweepers might gather atoms together to form wires. Or they might pile atoms into regularly spaced mounds that, together, affect light or magnetic fields in useful ways.—E. Sohn

Atom Hauler
Atom Hauler








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™