Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
A Sense of Danger
Roboroach and Company
Eyes on the Depths
Behavior
When Darwin got sick of feathers
Dino-bite!
Homework blues
Birds
Kookaburras
A Meal Plan for Birds
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
Music of the Future
Salt secrets
The memory of a material
Computers
Troubles with Hubble
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Unnatural Disasters
Deep Drilling at Sea
Environment
Indoor ozone stopper
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Spotty Survival
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
A Long Haul
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Parrotfish
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Packing Fat
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Corals
Oysters
Walking Sticks
Mammals
Gazelle
Black Bear
Manxes
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Making the most of a meal
Springing forward
Reptiles
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Moon's Icy Spray
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Troubles with Hubble
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Either Martians or Mars has gas
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Asteroid Lost and Found

Everybody loses things: Socks in the laundry. Sunglasses. Phone numbers written on little scraps of paper. You may have even lost your homework once or twice. But can you imagine losing an entire asteroid? That's exactly what happened to Hermes, an asteroid that vanished into the darkness after it was last spotted in 1937. Since then, astronomers have been scouring the skies for the runaway object. At long last, Hermes has shown up again. Early in the morning on Oct. 15, Brian Skiff of Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz., spotted a near-Earth asteroid and suspected it might be Hermes. Based on the asteroid's path, two scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., then used a computer program to trace the asteroid's journey over the past 66 years. They discovered that it has circled the sun 31 times without being seen. It has come as close as 640,000 kilometers to Earth, just 1.6 times the distance separating Earth and the moon. The scientists then looked ahead, calculating the asteroid's future path. Luckily, there's no chance that Hermes will crash into Earth within the next 100 years. New observations also show that Hermes is actually made up of two chunks that orbit each other. Each piece is about 300 to 450 meters across. Finding Hermes should help astronomers better understand how asteroids break apart and how each piece affects the movements of the other. Now, has anyone seen my mittens?E. Sohn

Asteroid Lost and Found
Asteroid Lost and Found








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™