Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Springing forward
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Toads
Newts
Animals
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Jay Watch
Monkey Math
Behavior
The Smell of Trust
Reading Body Language
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Birds
Swifts
Birds We Eat
Peafowl
Chemistry and Materials
Graphene's superstrength
Spinning Clay into Cotton
The Taste of Bubbles
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Middle school science adventures
Computers with Attitude
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Digging Dinos
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Pollution Detective
Whale Watch
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
A Big Discovery about Little People
Writing on eggshells
Fish
Carp
Skates
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Butterflies
Walking Sticks
Crawfish
Mammals
Sloth Bears
Asiatic Bears
Quokkas
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
One ring around them all
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Stalking Plants by Scent
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Pythons
Boa Constrictors
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Roving the Red Planet
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
A Change in Climate
Where rivers run uphill
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

African Jackal

A jackal is any of four small to medium-sized members of the family Canidae, found in Africa and Asia.

 


Just the Facts: Jackals fill a similar ecological niche to the Coyote in North America, that of scavengers and lesser predators. Their long legs and curved canine teeth are adapted for hunting small mammals, birds and reptiles. Blunt feet and fused leg bones give them a long-distance runner's physique, capable of maintaining speeds of 16km/h (10mph) for extended periods of time. They are nocturnal, most active at dawn and dusk.

All in the Family: In jackal society the social unit is that of a monogamous pair which defends its territory from other pairs. These territories are defended by vigorously chasing intruding rivals and marking landmarks around the territory with urine and feces. The territory may be large enough to hold some young adults who stay with their parents until they establish their own territory. Jackals may occasionally assemble in small packs, for example to scavenge a carcass, but normally hunt alone or as a pair.

Old-fashioned: Jackals are considered close to what all ancestral canids looked and behaved like. Despite their outward similarity, the four species are not considered closely related to one another.

The Simian Jackal is actually a wolf that took on the appearance of a large fox or jackal through convergent evolution (by adopting a similar diet of small rodents), and the other three 'true jackals' are believed to have split from each other 6 mya. The Golden Jackal is thought to have evolved in Asia whilst the other two species evolved in Africa.

Egyptian God: The Ancient Egyptian god of embalming and burial, Anubis, was depicted as a man with a jackal's head. The presence of jackals around abattoirs and funeral grounds gave rise to the association between jackals and the dead. Today they are one of the more commonly seen animals on safaris, and are found outside of national parks and do well in human altered landscapes and even near and
in human settlements.

African Jackal
African Jackal








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™