Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Silk’s superpowers
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Toads
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Polar Bears in Trouble
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Copybees
Behavior
Honeybees do the wave
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Longer lives for wild elephants
Birds
Cardinals
Woodpecker
Falcons
Chemistry and Materials
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
When frog gender flips
Sticky Silky Feet
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Troubles with Hubble
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
Feathered Fossils
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Warmest Year on Record
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
The Rise of Yellowstone
Environment
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Where rivers run uphill
Pollution Detective
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Early Maya Writing
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
Halibut
Mako Sharks
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Sponges' secret weapon
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Sun Screen
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Crawfish
Centipedes
Ticks
Mammals
Beagles
Squirrels
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Physics
Speedy stars
Invisibility Ring
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Fast-flying fungal spores
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Snakes
Lizards
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Black Holes That Burp
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Ready, unplug, drive
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Watering the Air
Add your Article

A Newspaper's Hidden Cost

It’s a morning ritual for millions of people: Wake up. Have breakfast. Read the paper.

This simple, groggy habit is taking its toll on the environment, say researchers from the University of California, Berkeley. In a recent study, they found that reading the news on a handheld computer would be much better for the planet than reading the paper version.

For their study, the researchers focused on the New York Times, which has more subscribers per 7-day week than any other newspaper in the United States. About 1.2 million subscribers get it on weekdays, and 1.7 million get the Sunday edition.

Producing the paper uses up a lot of energy and resources, the researchers found. One year’s worth of the New York Times weighs about 236 kilograms. It takes about 22,700 liters of water each year to make the paper for just one reader. The same processes release about 660 kilograms of carbon dioxide, a gas that contributes to global warming. Printing and transporting the newspaper release even more.

The researchers found that, just by trying to stay informed, a single daily reader in Berkeley contributes 270 kilograms of extra carbon dioxide to the atmosphere every year.

The New York Times also happens to be available in electronic form. People can download it through a wireless signal onto a portable little computer called a personal digital assistant (PDA), for example.

The researchers added up all of the energy that it takes to make a PDA and its batteries, recharge the batteries, and download the New York Times. They found that an individual reader using a PDA would be responsible for producing just 5 kilograms of carbon dioxide.

Clearly, it would be far more efficient if everyone took PDAs to the breakfast table instead of newspapers.

The hard part will be convincing people to get cozy with computers, when the act of turning pages or scanning the comics can be so enjoyable. And, even though it’s okay to spill cereal on the paper, a splash of juice on the PDA could be disastrous!—E. Sohn

A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™