Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Lives of a Mole Rat
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Behavior
A Recipe for Happiness
Between a rock and a wet place
The Disappearing Newspaper
Birds
Kingfishers
Quails
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Picture the Smell
Popping to Perfection
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Galaxies on the go
Middle school science adventures
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Bugs with Gas
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
What is groundwater
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Sharks
Goldfish
Electric Eel
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Yummy bugs
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Music in the Brain
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Earthworms
Dragonflies
Krill
Mammals
Yaks
Aardvarks
Tigers
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
The algae invasion
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Lizards
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Planets on the Edge
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Riding Sunlight
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Earth's Poles in Peril
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

A New Touch

Many people who have artificial arms or legs find these devices clumsy and difficult to operate. What’s missing is the ability to think about making a movement, then having that movement happen.

Now, researchers from the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and their coworkers have moved a step closer toward this goal. They have developed a technique that could eventually allow people to feel heat and other sensations through their new limbs.

In your body, the nervous system carries messages from your brain to your muscles, telling them what to do. When you want to open your fist, for example, the nerve cells in your hand receive electrical signals that make the finger muscles move.

After the amputation of a hand, however, people also lose the hand’s nerve cells—and the ability to move the limb just by thinking about it or to feel anything.

To restore nerve-activated movement, the scientists started by identifying the nerves that once led to the lost limb. They then redirected these nerves to muscles in the patient’s chest.

As a result, when the patient thought about moving her arm, the message from her brain ended up in her chest muscles instead of in her hand. The muscles twitched, and a device on the skin picked up the muscles’ signal and sent an electrical pulse to the artificial arm, which then moved.

In a recent study, the first woman to have the procedure reported that moving her artificial arm felt natural.

Scientists also went a step farther. Surgeons rewired sensory nerves that originally went to the hand to a patch of skin that covers the chest muscles. When they later pressed on various parts of this area, the patient felt tingling sensations in what seemed to be individual fingers and the palm of her missing hand.

The patient was also able to feel cold, heat, and vibrations in the lost limb when the scientists applied those sensations to the skin on her chest.

“The fact that they were able to provide this degree of use [with the artificial arm] and the potential for sensory control is really quite wonderful,” comments Gregory A. Clark, a bioengineer at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

Next, the group plans to work on developing artificial limbs that will allow their users to feel things. One possibility would be to put sensors on the artificial fingers that would deliver sensations to another part of the body.

Then, it wouldn’t matter if the hand holding a cup of hot cocoa were real or artificial. The cup would still feel hot.—E. Sohn

A New Touch
A New Touch








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™