Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Roboroach and Company
Jay Watch
Living in the Desert
Behavior
Surprise Visitor
Fish needs see-through head
Making light of sleep
Birds
Chicken
Ospreys
Vultures
Chemistry and Materials
Picture the Smell
Small but WISE
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Computers
The Book of Life
A Classroom of the Mind
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Feathered Fossils
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Environment
A Change in Leaf Color
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Barracudas
Codfish
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Building a Food Pyramid
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
A New Touch
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Termites
Roundworms
Invertebrates
Mammals
Miniature Schnauzers
Wombats
Kangaroos
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Project Music
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Snakes
Sea Turtles
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
Ready, Set, Supernova
Ringing Saturn
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Reach for the Sky
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on the Road, Again
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Recipe for a Hurricane
Watering the Air
Add your Article

A Darker, Warmer Red Planet

Our planet is getting warmer, and ice at the North and South Poles is melting. Global warming may be happening on Mars too.

When the sun shines on a planet, the planet’s surface reflects some of the sunlight back into space. Other sunlight gets absorbed and warms the planet. Light-colored surfaces, such as white ice caps, reflect more sunlight than dark surfaces do. By contrast, dark surfaces absorb more of the sun’s radiation, which makes them get hotter.

Scientists who’ve compared pictures of Mars taken by satellites in the 1970s to images taken more recently have noticed that the Red Planet’s surface looks different than it used to. In some areas, the landscape looks much darker, while in others, it looks lighter. Overall, the surface of Mars—especially in the planet’s southern hemisphere—has grown darker over the past 30 years.

Most of those changes probably occurred because Martian winds blew away light-colored dust that had covered many regions. That exposed darker rocks that had been covered with dust.

The darkening of Mars has caused the planet to get warmer, a new study suggests. Scientists calculated how much more sunlight and heat Mars absorbs now. They compared that to how much it absorbed in the late 1970s. They estimate that the planet’s atmosphere is almost 1°C warmer, on average, than it was 30 years ago.

Some areas of Mars have warmed more than average. For example, the planet’s south pole may be 4°C warmer than it was in the late 1970s. That could explain why the ice cap at that pole has been melting recently, scientists say. Until now, they didn’t know why that was happening.

Like climate change on Earth, the change in Mars’ climate isn’t due to increases in the sun’s radiation, scientists say.—C. Gramling

A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™