Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Sea Lilies on the Run
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
Behavior
Reading Body Language
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Birds
Dodos
Backyard Birds
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
A Light Delay
A Framework for Growing Bone
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Look into My Eyes
Computers with Attitude
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Supersight for a Dino King
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Springing forward
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Environment
Shrimpy Invaders
Plastic Meals for Seals
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Words of the Distant Past
A Long Haul
Fish
Piranha
Marlin
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Running with Sneaker Science
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Mosquitos
Grasshoppers
Starfish
Mammals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Baboons
Persian Cats
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Invisibility Ring
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Making the most of a meal
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Geckos
Box Turtles
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Unveiling Titan
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Killers from Outer Space
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Arctic Melt
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

A Big, Weird Dino

A new dinosaur find has forced scientists to rethink their understanding of these ancient creatures.

The feathered dino, which belongs to a new genus called Gigantoraptor, was surprisingly huge and heavy for its shape. It belonged to a group of birdlike dinosaurs called oviraptors. The largest animals in this group weighed no more than 40 kilograms (88 pounds).

Gigantoraptor, by comparison, weighed about 1.4 metric tons (more than 3,000 pounds). It was 8 meters (26 feet) long and 3.5 meters (11.5 feet) tall at its shoulder. It lived in what is now northern China, where scientists from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing found most of its leg and tail bones. The team also found part of its lower jaw and spine.

The scientists dug up the first of the creature’s bones in April 2005. The huge size of the fossils threw them off. “We first thought it might be from a sauropod,” says researcher Xing Xu. Sauropods were enormous, long-necked dinosaurs known to have lived in the region around 70 million years ago. “Then, we thought it might be from a tyrannosaur,” like Tyrannosaurus Rex, Xu adds.

As they discovered more fossils however, the scientists realized that they were looking at a new species. Based on the number of growth rings in the animal’s bones and the distances between those rings, the researchers estimate that the Gigantoraptor was about 11 years old when it died. Other evidence suggests that the giant was a young adult, but still growing.

Gigantoraptors, it appears, grew more quickly and reached adulthood earlier than the huge tyrannosaurs did, says Thomas R. Holtz Jr., a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Maryland at College Park. Growing quickly, he says, would have helped protect the newly discovered species from attacks by hungry tyrannosaurs.

The sizes and proportions of the newly discovered dino’s leg bones suggest that the animal was a speedy runner. It “would have been among the fastest dinosaurs of its body size,” Holtz speculates.

Many oviraptors had feathers, and because Gigantoraptor looked like these smaller, birdlike animals, Xu suspects it had feathers too. That’s a perplexing thought. Within the family of dinosaurs that produced birds, animals with larger bodies usually looked less like birds than smaller members of the group did. The bigger animals tended to have smaller limbs relative to their bodies, and their lower-leg bones were shorter in proportion to their upper legs.

“It’s really a surprising discovery,” says Xu. Adds Holtz, “This is one weird dinosaur.”—Emily Sohn

A Big, Weird Dino
A Big, Weird Dino








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™