Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Newts
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Fishy Cleaners
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Behavior
Primate Memory Showdown
A Global Warming Flap
Night of the living ants
Birds
Emus
Woodpecker
Owls
Chemistry and Materials
Heaviest named element is official
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Fog Buster
Computers
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Galaxies far, far, far away
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
South America's sticky tar pits
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Petrified Lightning
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
A Global Warming Flap
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Saltwater Fish
Catfish
Manta Rays
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Healing Honey
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Monkeys Count
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
Spit Power
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Roundworms
Snails
Mammals
Golden Retrievers
African Hippopotamus
Polar Bear
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Fungus Hunt
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Snakes
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
A Smashing Display
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Bionic Bacteria
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Robots on a Rocky Road
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Where rivers run uphill
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Children and Media

How children use media has a lot to do with who they are. Although no two kids are exactly alike, children generally go through the same stages of development. Knowing these stages can help you encourage your child to use media in new and creative ways.

Your 3 year old says...

  • I can tell simple stories.

    What you can do: Ask your child specific questions about what's on TV, on the computer screen and in books. As your child speaks, you might add information to help him learn new vocabulary. For example, if your child says "dog," you can say, "yes, the large, furry dog."

  • I like hearing and seeing the same story over and over again.

    What you can do: Ask your child questions about TV shows, videos and software games — even if they are favorites that he's seen a dozen times. Though you may have memorized a story, your child may still be learning it.

  • I like to sing simple songs and can carry a tune.

    What you can do: Choose TV programs and computer activities that include songs and rhythms. Encourage your child to sing and dance rather than just watch. Don't be afraid to sing and dance together.

  • I can name and match basic colors, like red, blue, yellow and green. I am starting to learn shapes.

    What you can do: Ask your child questions while he's watching TV and playing on the computer. For example, point to the screen and ask: "What is that number?" "Does that door look like a rectangle or a circle?" "Do you know what color her shoes are?"

  • I like to ask who, what and why questions.

    What you can do: While watching TV shows, playing with software or visiting Web sites, explain to your child why certain events happen, who characters are and why they do the things they do.

  • I am interested in things that are the same and things that are different.

    What you can do: Point out when a TV character or animal does something physical that your child can do too — like hopping, jumping, going down a slide or walking like a monkey. Then do the motion together.

  • I want to move my body in new ways.

    What you can do: Choose TV programs and computer activities that include songs and rhythms. Encourage your child to sing and dance rather than just watch. Don't be afraid to sing and dance together.

  • I enjoy helping out around the house and doing easy chores.

    What you can do: If you make a habit of covering the TV set or closing the doors to a cabinet where the computer is stored, encourage your child to be a part of that ritual.

  • I know whether I am a boy or a girl. I am learning what boys and girls are supposed to wear and what they are supposed to do.

    What you can do: Avoid TV shows with gender stereotypes that teach your child that an activity is "just for boys" or "just for girls." Tell your child that both girls and boys can be anything they want to be and give specific examples.

  • I like to hear stories that are about me.

    What you can do: If you have made home videos or have a scrapbook or pictures of your child, look at them with him and talk about what happened the day you took the pictures.

  • I spend a lot of time watching what's going on around me.

    What you can do: Turn TV watching into an activity. Ask your child questions about what he sees and hears.

  • If I am around people who seem different from me, I may become curious and ask questions.

    What you can do: Choose TV shows, books and software that expose your child to people of different backgrounds. Talk to him about what makes a culture unique and special.

 Children and Media









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