Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
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Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Fishy Cleaners
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Fighting fat with fat
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Math Naturals
Birds
Pigeons
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Undercover Detectives
Batteries built by Viruses
When frog gender flips
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Computers with Attitude
Middle school science adventures
Games with a Purpose
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Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
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Digging for Ancient DNA
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Warmest Year on Record
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Missing Tigers in India
Power of the Wind
Giant snakes invading North America
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Settling the Americas
Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Marlin
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Chew for Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
A Long Trek to Asia
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
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Yorkshire Terriers
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
One ring around them all
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Nature's Alphabet
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
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Crocodilians
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Young Scientists Take Flight
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Catching Some Rays
Warmest Year on Record
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The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs - The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs

The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs

A new twist in an old story about dinosaur bones sounds like a fairy tale for fossil fans: Once upon a time, scientists discovered three different dinosaur skulls in the northern United States. The first skull, found in 1931, was large and round. The seco Read More



Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop

The sun is a strange and turbulent place. The scorching hot ball of gas may look smooth from a safe distance, but dark spots, violent explosions, and massive eruptions constantly come and go on its surface. Read More

Ants on Stilts

If you want to know how far you've walked, you can choose among several strategies. You can measure your route on a map. You can wear a handy gadget, such as a GPS device that calculates distances or a pedometer that counts your steps. Or you can ask Read More

Poodles

The Poodle is a breed of dog; specifically, it is a gun dog noted for its ability in the water and bird hunting skills. The English name comes from the German Pudel, or Pudelhund – from Old German puddeln, meaning "to splash about". Read More

Prairie Dogs By Prairie Dogs

Prairie dogs are small, stout-bodied, burrowing rodents with shallow cheek pouches native to the grasslands of North America. The name "prairie dog" came from their bark-like call, not from their appearance. Read More

A Change in Climate

From one day to the next, weather can have a big effect on your life. When it rains, you have to stay indoors or carry an umbrella. When it's cold, you have to bundle up. Read More

Fog Buster

If you've worn goggles for skiing or swimming, you've probably been annoyed by the way they can cloud up. Or, if you've used a Game Boy, you might have noticed how screen glare can wipe out crucial details as you play a tricky videogame. Read More

Squeezing Oil from Old Wells

Oil fuels the lives of most people around the world. We use it to power our cars and planes, heat our homes, and even manufacture shoes, plastic bottles, and other products. Without it, the world would be a very different place. Read More

Challenging the Forces of Nature

A tsunami is approaching the beach. Time is running out. In just 20 minutes, it'll be all over. "We should start focusing on how to prevent the tsunami," says 14-year-old Anudeep Gosal of Orlando, Fla. His teammates, all 12-to-14-year-olds, are drawing o Read More

Island Extinctions

People arrived in Australia about 50,000 years ago. Soon after, many of the island's large mammals disappeared, new evidence suggests.Among the animals that went extinct were several species of kangaroos and wombats and some other creatures. Read More

Wildcats

The wildcat Felis silvestris, sometimes "wildcat" or "wild-cat" especially when distinguishing from other wild species of felines, is a small predator native to Europe, the western part of Asia, and Africa. Read More

Childhood's Long History

You're lucky. Compared to other animals, you get to be a kid for a long time before you have to strike off on your own. Recent studies suggest that people have been enjoying long childhoods for many thousands of years. Read More

Putting a Mouse on Pause

Do you hate cold winters, or do you have a tough week coming up? Someday, you might be able to hibernate through them! Scientists have found a way to bring breathing and heart rate nearly to a standstill in mice without killing them. It doesn't even seem Read More

Acid Snails

Factories, cars, and other machines spit out lots of a gas called carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is known as a greenhouse gas because it traps heat in the atmosphere. More and more of the gas has been accumulating in the air in recent years. Read More

Asteroid Lost and Found

Everybody loses things: Socks in the laundry. Sunglasses. Phone numbers written on little scraps of paper. You may have even lost your homework once or twice. But can you imagine losing an entire asteroid? Read More

Gerbils

A gerbil is a small mammal of the order Rodentia. Once known simply as "desert rats," the gerbil subfamily includes about 110 species of African, Indian, and Asian rodents, including sand rats and jirds, all of which are adapted to arid habitats. Read More

Lungfish

Lungfishes are sarcopterygian fish belonging to the order Dipnoi. Sarcopterygii (from Greek sarx, flesh, and pteryx, fin) are bony fish with paired rounded fins. Read More

Mother-of-Pearl on Ice

Pearls are some of the more beautiful examples of nature's strength. The gemstones grow inside oysters, and they are remarkably sturdy and tough. Now, scientists have found a way to copy what oysters have been doing all along. They've made a pearl-like m Read More

Lizards

Although sometimes used as a general term for all reptiles, lizards are actually a specific order of reptiles. Most lizards have long, four-legged bodies with long, tapering tails, and many species have the ability to change the color of their skin. Read More

Ibises

Ibises are a group of long-legged wading birds in the family Threskiornithidae. They all have long down curved bills, and usually feed as a group, probing mud for food items, usually crustaceans. Read More

Jay Watch

When some birds store food for future meals, they pay close attention to who might be watching when they hide the food. In the presence of thieves, the birds go to extra trouble to save their hoards. Read More

A Spider's Silky Strength

Legend has it that a Chinese princess discovered silk while drinking tea under a mulberry tree. A silkworm cocoon fell into her cup, and when she grabbed the bundle, it unwound into a single strand of silk. For thousands of years, the Chinese kept the pro Read More

Undercover Detectives

It sounds like the beginning of a mystery movie: Last month, researchers traveled to the French countryside in search of hidden works of art. But this is no Hollywood blockbuster—at least not yet. It's a real-life mystery being tackled by a team of engin Read More

Staying Away from Sick Lobsters

Lobsters may have a sick sense. New experiments show that certain kinds of lobsters avoid sick individuals even before the infected lobsters are contagious or show symptoms that people can see. It's the first evidence that healthy wild animals detect and Read More

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Black Holes That Burp

Black Holes That Burp

It wouldn’t be very pleasant to go near a black hole. Armed with an enormous amount of gravitational pull, the incredibly tiny but supermassive object would swallow you alive and stretch you into a pi... Read More

Losing with Heads or Tails

Losing with Heads or Tails

Heads, you win. Tails, you lose. It turns out that coin tosses may be less fair than you might think. A new mathematical analysis even suggests a way to increase your chances of winning. ... Read More

Electric Backpack

Electric Backpack

Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass., have invented a backpack that makes electricity from energy produced while its... Read More

Lost Sight, Found Sound

Lost Sight, Found Sound

In some children who go blind, certain parts of the brain that normally control vision appear to switch jobs and focus instead on sound, a new study has found. ... Read More

Mussels

Mussels

The term mussel is used for several families of bivalve mollusks inhabiting lakes, rivers, and creeks, as well as intertidal areas along coastlines worldwide. ... Read More

Your inner Neandertal

Your inner Neandertal

The entire genetic code of a species is called its genome, and it is a list of all the important genes in the species’ DNA. These genes contain the instructions for how to build proteins, and proteins... Read More

Chew for Health

Chew for Health

Most schools ban chewing gum, but in a few years they might consider changing that rule. Why? Scientists are finding evidence that gum chewing may be good for your health. It may even help boost your ... Read More

Sheep

Sheep

The domestic sheep (Ovis aries), the most common species of the sheep genus (Ovis), is a woolly ruminant quadruped which probably descends from the wild mouflon of south-central and south-west Asia. I... Read More

Improving the Camel

Improving the Camel

When I signed up for a 2-day camel trek during my recent trip to India, I was worried that the camel would spit at me, throw me off its back, or run full speed into the desert as I clutched its neck f... Read More

The Smell of Trust

The Smell of Trust

Let's say you find yourself with a pile of extra money. You meet a banker who tells you to hand it all over to him. He'll invest it and make you rich. "Trust me," he says. Do you? Whether o... Read More

Dreams of Floating in Space

Dreams of Floating in Space

On Feb. 1, just minutes before it was scheduled to land, the space shuttle Columbia tore apart, killing all seven of its crew.... Read More

Making Sense of Scents

Making Sense of Scents

The nose knows. Your sense of smell can quickly alert you to freshly baked, chocolate chip cookies, a fragrant flower, or a stinky pair of socks. Now, scientists have a better idea of how the brain m... Read More

Nanomagnets Corral Oil

Nanomagnets Corral Oil

You’ve probably seen some of the cool things magnets can do. Place one near a paper clip, and the clip zooms across the table toward the magnet. Hold one magnet near another, and the second one myster... Read More

A Butterfly's Electric Glow

A Butterfly's Electric Glow

The blue-green streaks of a swallowtail butterfly's wings are more than just beautiful. They're also a lesson in physics. Swallowtails that belong to a group called Princeps nireus actually have fluor... Read More

Who's Knocking?

Who's Knocking?

Is it, or isn't it? That's been the question on every bird-lover's lips since April, when scientists announced that the ivory-billed woodpecker is still alive (see "Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpe... Read More









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