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Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
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Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Thieves of a Feather
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Mind-reading Machine
Pipefish power from mom
Memory by Hypnosis
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Emus
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A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
The Taste of Bubbles
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Music of the Future
Small but WISE
The Book of Life
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Digging Dinos
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Meet the new dinos
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Life under Ice
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
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Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Blooming Jellies
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
Childhood's Long History
Fakes in the museum
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Carp
Great White Shark
Puffer Fish
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
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Who vs. That vs. Which
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Mastering The GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Monkeys Count
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
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Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
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Road Bumps
Project Music
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Farms sprout in cities
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Slip-sliding away
World of Three Suns
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
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Machine Copy
Weaving with Light
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Reach for the Sky
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Arctic Melt
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Polar Ice Feels the HeatPolar Ice Feels the Heat - Polar Ice Feels the Heat

Polar Ice Feels the Heat

Can you feel the world getting warmer? Maybe you can’t, but ice across the planet’s surface has certainly been feeling the heat, according to new reports. Indeed, the dramatic shrinkage of Arctic ice—and at some spots, its seasonal near disappearance—is o Read More



Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone

The last dinosaurs on Earth died some 65 million years ago, but they left bits of themselves behind everywhere they lived. Around the world, dug-up bones have given scientists lots of clues about what the mega-reptiles were like. Now, paleontologists have Read More

Rats

A rat is any one of about 56 different species of small, omnivorous rodents belonging to the genus Rattus. The group is generally known as the Old World rats or true rats, and originated in Asia. Read More

Gliders in the Family

Watching monkeys at the zoo can be fascinating because the animals' actions are so similar to those of people. Along with gorillas, orangutans, lemurs, and others, monkeys belong to a group of mammals called primates. People are primates, too. Now, scien Read More

Powering Ball Lightning

Ball lightning is one of the strangest objects you might never see. The rare, basketball-sized fireballs occasionally form in nature after lightning strikes soil. They can float or bounce and last for several minutes before disappearing. Read More

Solving a Sedna Mystery

Orbiting beyond Pluto, a planetoid called Sedna has aroused plenty of curiosity—and created some confusion—since its discovery last year. It's the most-remote object known in the solar system. Read More

Ancient Heights

You probably know where all the hills are in your neighborhood. Even so, the planet hasn't always had the same lumps. In some places, Earth was even lumpier that it is now. In other places, it was smoother. Over millions of years, entire mountain ranges h Read More

A Recipe for Happiness

It feels good to be happy. Laughing is fun. And most people like to have a good time. "If you ask people what they want for their children, most say, 'I want them to be happy,'" says psychologist and happiness researcher Sonja Lyubomirsky of the Universi Read More

Seeds of the Future

On an unusual old farm in New York City, workers are stashing away the seeds of the future. In this unlikely place, researchers are putting the seeds from flowering plants and trees in a sleeplike state called suspended animation. Many years from now, ot Read More

Woolly Mammoths

A mammoth is any of a number of an extinct genus of elephant, often with long curved tusks and, in northern species, a covering of long hair. They lived during the Pleistocene epoch from 1.6 million years ago to around 3,500 years ago. Read More

Lice

A louse egg is commonly called a nit. Lice attach their eggs to their host's hair with specialized saliva which results in a bond that is very difficult to separate without specialized products. Read More

Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver

It's a good thing we can't get anywhere near a black hole. If it were possible, the consequences would not be pretty. A black hole is a point in space where gravity is so intense that not even light can escape its tremendous grip. Read More

Electric Eel

The electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) is a species of fish capable of generating powerful electric shocks of up to 650 volts, which it uses for both hunting and self-defense. Despite its name it is not an eel at all but rather a knifefish! Read More

Charged cars that would charge

In the middle of February, Tom Gage drove his car right into a building in downtown San Diego. Gage didn’t crash his car; he was showing it off — to a crowd gathered at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Read More

Mice sense each other's fear

You can usually tell when people are afraid just by the look on their faces. Mice can tell when other mice are afraid too. But instead of using their beady little eyes to detect fear in their fellows, they use their pink little noses. Read More

Giant Squid

Giant squid, once believed to be mythical creatures, are squid of the Architeuthidae family, represented by as many as eight species of the genus Architeuthis. They are deep-ocean dwelling squid that can grow to a tremendous size. Read More

Nature's Alphabet

Kjell Sandved was sitting on a tree branch in Panama when he found himself staring into the face of a viper. The poisonous snake had coiled its body a few times around a nearby branch. Its neck rested on the coils. Read More

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

If you've ever tried to grow your own flowers or vegetables, you know that gardening is an art as much as it is a science. The science part just took a step forward, at least for tomatoes. Read More

Spiders

Spiders are predatory invertebrate animals with two body segments, eight legs, no chewing mouth parts and no wings. All spiders produce silk, a thin, strong protein strand extruded by the spider from spinnerets. Read More

Tree Frogs

Tree frogs are frogs of the family Hylidae. There is large variation within the tree frogs. Many of the arboreal frogs are green in colour, whereas the terrestrial and aquatic species are duller. Read More

Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around

The tiny bugs that can cause disease often have ingenious ways of spreading themselves around. Now, scientists have figured out how one particular parasite does it—by forcing its host sand fly to spit up. Read More

Capybaras

The capybara, Hydrochoerus Hydrochaeris, is a semi-aquatic rodent of South America. It weighs about 40 kg (hundred pounds) , and is about .6 meters (2 feet) tall at the shoulder. It is the largest rodent. Read More

Undersea Vent System Active for Ages

Deep at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, there is a huge and mysterious network of rock structures called the Lost City. Rock spires on the steep slopes of an undersea mountain stretch as high as 18-story buildings. Cracks in the rocks spit out warm flu Read More

Tarantula

True tarantulas are spiders belonging to the family Theraphosidae (Greek for thera "wild animal, beast" + phos "light"). These spiders may also be known as bird spiders, monkey spiders, baboon spiders or rain spiders. Read More

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Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows

Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows

You probably use tools all day long without even thinking about it. You pick up a pencil to write. You deliver food to your mouth with a fork or spoon. You use keys to open doors. And you probably lea... Read More

Programming with Alice

Programming with Alice

Shriveled, slithery, and wily, Gollum is one of the more memorable characters in the Lord of the Rings movies. But it took computers to bring Gollum to life, creating animated images of the character ... Read More

The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence

The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence

Snowy states like Wyoming have long used wooden snow fences to stop blowing snow from covering highways. Wide drifts form behind the fences instead of on the roads. ... Read More

A Dino King's Ancestor

A Dino King's Ancestor

Tyrannosaurus rex gets a lot of attention for being one of the fiercest large dinosaurs that ever lived. These fearsome meat eaters, however, weren't the first of their kind. In northwestern China, p... Read More

Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships

Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships By Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation

Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships... Read More

Whale Watch

Whale Watch

It doesn't matter how seasick people may feel. When a whale appears, nothing else matters, says whale researcher Steve Palumbi. "Everyone—from 5 to 95 years old—rushes to the side of the boat.&qu... Read More

Dinosaur Dig

Dinosaur Dig

It was hot and dry when I spent the Fourth of July digging for fossils on the 5E Ranch north of Billings, Mont. This sort of weather isn't unusual in central Montana. Some parts of the state are nearl... Read More

Yummy bugs

Yummy bugs

Although unusual as food items, bugs do make sense here because this is the Insectarium (in sek TAIR’ ee um). As its unusual name implies, the entire museum will be devoted to the world’s six-legged s... Read More

Goats

Goats

The domestic goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a domesticated subspecies of the wild goat of southwest Asia and eastern Europe. Domestic goats are one of the oldest domesticated species. A goat is said ... Read More

The Smell of Trust

The Smell of Trust

Let's say you find yourself with a pile of extra money. You meet a banker who tells you to hand it all over to him. He'll invest it and make you rich. "Trust me," he says. Do you? Whether o... Read More

Galaxies on the go

Galaxies on the go

Scientists have a mystery of cosmic proportions on their hands. Recently astronomers noticed something strange. It seems that millions of stars are racing at high speeds toward a single spot in the sk... Read More

Unnatural Disasters

Unnatural Disasters

On Aug. 29, Hurricane Katrina slammed into the southeastern United States and dumped more than a foot of rain in some places. Gusts of wind topped 140 miles per hour, and the ocean rose as high as 20 ... Read More

Undercover Detectives

Undercover Detectives

It sounds like the beginning of a mystery movie: Last month, researchers traveled to the French countryside in search of hidden works of art. But this is no Hollywood blockbuster—at least not yet. It... Read More

Yaks

Yaks

The yak (Bos grunniens) is a long-haired humped domestic bovine found in Tibet and throughout the Himalayan region of south central Asia, as well as in Mongolia. In Tibetan, the word yak refers only t... Read More

Making good, brown fat

Making good, brown fat

Not all fats are created equal: There’s white fat, which stores energy. There’s also another kind of human body fat that actually burns energy and heats up. Babies have this kind of fat, and earlier t... Read More









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