Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Got Milk? How?
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Blotchy Face, Big-Time Wasp
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Behavior
Swine flu goes global
A Light Delay
Fighting fat with fat
Birds
Swans
Flamingos
Cranes
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
Music of the Future
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Look into My Eyes
Fingerprint Evidence
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet your mysterious relative
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Bugs with Gas
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
An Ocean View's Downside
Whale Watch
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Settling the Americas
Fish
Hagfish
Swordfish
Dogfish
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
The mercury in that tuna
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math Naturals
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Flu Patrol
Invertebrates
Tarantula
Caterpillars
Camel Spiders
Mammals
Killer Whales
Hares
Baboons
Parents
How children learn
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Electric Backpack
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Stalking Plants by Scent
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Snakes
Lizards
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Beyond Bar Codes
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Troubles with Hubble
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
A Change in Climate
A Dire Shortage of Water
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A Puffy Planetary Puzzle A Puffy Planetary Puzzle - A Puffy Planetary Puzzle

A Puffy Planetary Puzzle

Astronomers recently made a fuss about Pluto, saying that it's not really big enough to be called a planet. Now, they're making a fuss about a planet that might be the largest one yet discovered. Read More



Planning for Mars

Forget the moon: We’re headed to Mars. That’s one message President Obama delivered on April 15, during a speech about the future of the U.S. space program. Read More

Crocodiles

Crocodiles (colloquially called crocs) are large aquatic reptiles that live throughout the Tropics in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia. Crocodiles tend to congregate in slow-moving rivers and lakes. Read More

Freshwater Fish

Fish -- both wild and domestic -- can be divided into two categories: saltwater and freshwater. Freshwater fish live in fresh bodies of water (like lakes, streams and rivers) rather than oceans, or other bodies with a high salt content. Read More

A Moon's Icy Spray

At Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, geysers such as the famous Old Faithful regularly spout water hundreds of feet into the air. The jets are impressive, but they're nothing compared to geysers on one of Saturn's moons. Read More

African Wildedbeest

The wildebeest, also called the gnu (pronounced "new"), is a large hooved mammal of the genus Connochaetes, which includes two species, both native to Africa. Gnus belong to the family Bovidae, which includes antelopes, cattle, goats, and others. Read More

Sponges

The sponges or poriferans (from the Greek poros "pore" and ferro "to bear") are animals of the phylum Porifera. They are primitive, sessile, mostly marine, water dwelling filter feeders that pump water through their bodies. Read More

Ancient Heights

You probably know where all the hills are in your neighborhood. Even so, the planet hasn't always had the same lumps. In some places, Earth was even lumpier that it is now. In other places, it was smoother. Over millions of years, entire mountain ranges h Read More

Packing Fat

In developed parts of the world, from Australia to Europe to the United States, waistlines are bulging. People weigh more than ever before. Even children are joining the ranks of the obese in record numbers, and scientists are concerned. Read More

Canines

Canines are a group of carnivorous mammals, usually sharing the common physical traits of triangular ears, a long, tapered snout, and a somewhat bushy tail. These animals are all digitigrades, meaning they walk on their toes. Read More

Prime Time for Cicadas

If it hasn't happened yet, it could occur any day now. The first signs are little holes in the ground in yards, orchards, and fields. Then, one warm evening, big, red-eyed bugs start crawling out of the holes. Read More

Lost Sight, Found Sound

In some children who go blind, certain parts of the brain that normally control vision appear to switch jobs and focus instead on sound, a new study has found. Read More

Moose

Alces alces, called the moose in North America and the elk in Europe is the largest member of the deer family Cervidae, distinguished from other members of Cervidae by the form of the palmate antlers of its males. Read More

Pomeranians

The Pomeranian is a breed of dog in the spitz family, named for the Pomerania region of Poland and eastern Germany, and classed as a toy dog breed because of its small size. Read More

The Oily Gulf

On the night of April 20, an explosion rocked the Deepwater Horizon. The Deepwater Horizon was a huge building or platform in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico used to drill oil from deep below the ocean floor. Read More

Blue Jays

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a North American jay, a handsome bird with lavender-blue to mid-blue feathering from the top of the head to midway down the back. There is a pronounced crest on the head. Read More

Cool Penguins

Raising a baby takes a lot of work, especially when that baby is a king penguin. Now, it looks like climate change will make life even harder for these birds. A new study suggests that warmer waters could shrink their numbers. Read More

Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. Read More

Speedy stars

Think stars don’t move? Think again! When you look into the sky at night, the stars may appear to stay in place. But stars are always on the move — they’re just so far away that the motion is hard to see. Read More

When Fungi and Algae Marry

Despite their reputation as scientific curiosities, lichens have a practical side. Throughout history, people have used different species to make dyes for fabrics, poisons for arrowheads, and "green"-smelling scents for perfumes. Read More

Pipefish power from mom

Broad-nosed pipefish are curious little creatures. They’re close cousins of seahorses, and they look like straws with eyes. They’re tiny and narrow, and their slender bodies mean they can easily hide from predators by swimming into underwater grasses. And Read More

Bald Eagles Forever

Trouble for bald eagles and other birds began when farmers began to use a chemical called DDT, which protected crops from insects but also killed birds and made the shells of their eggs dangerously thin. Read More

Puberty gone wild

Breakouts, mood swings and sudden growth spurts: Puberty can be downright awkward. Even if you’re not of the human species. Puberty is a period in which humans move from childhood to adulthood. During this transition, the body goes through many physical Read More

Pythons

Python is the common name for a group of non-venomous constricting snakes, specifically the family Pythonidae. Other sources consider this group a subfamily of the Boas (Pythoninae). Pythons are more related to boas than to any other snake-family. Read More

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Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy

Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy

It's mysterious. It's so dark that it's invisible. And, boy, is it repulsive! Still, astronomers who study dark energy in the universe keep learning new things about it. ... Read More

Tarrant High overcoming the odds

Tarrant High overcoming the odds By Anastasia Cunningham

Situated off Molynes Road in St Andrew, the 51-year-old Tarrant High School has had a chequered past, permeated by academic underperformance, violence and indiscipline. Following the release of this y... Read More

Yorkshire Terriers

Yorkshire Terriers

The Yorkshire Terrier, also known as a Yorkie, is a breed of small dog, one of many toy dog breeds. Yorkies can be very small, usually weighing between 5 and 7 lbs. The Yorkie has a compact, small bui... Read More

Challenging the Forces of Nature

Challenging the Forces of Nature

A tsunami is approaching the beach. Time is running out. In just 20 minutes, it'll be all over. "We should start focusing on how to prevent the tsunami," says 14-year-old Anudeep Gosal of O... Read More

City Trees Beat Country Trees

City Trees Beat Country Trees

There are city people, and there are country people. Now, the same may be true for trees. A common type of tree grows twice as well in New York City as it does in rural places around the state, resear... Read More

A Light Delay

A Light Delay

Scientists from Harvard University recently demonstrated a way to catch and release light—but it’s not easy. In other words, no one will be using the new method to play a game of catch with flashlight... Read More

Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy

Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy

It's hard to imagine being so hungry that you'd eat another person. Yet, cannibalism occurs among animals and elsewhere in nature. Even galaxies do it. ... Read More

Pigeons

Pigeons

The large bird genus Columba comprises a group of medium to large stout-bodied pigeons, often referred to as the typical pigeons. As with other genera in the family, the terms dove and pigeon are used... Read More

Backyard Birds

Backyard Birds

Birdwatching doesn't always mean hiking to exotic locations or wandering deep into the forest in search of feathered friends. Adaptable to almost any environment, many species of birds have made our h... Read More

Tarantula

Tarantula

True tarantulas are spiders belonging to the family Theraphosidae (Greek for thera "wild animal, beast" + phos "light"). These spiders may also be known as bird spiders, monkey spi... Read More

Digging for Ancient DNA

Digging for Ancient DNA

In the movie Jurassic Park, scientists discover fossilized insects that had eaten dinosaur blood just before they died. The dino blood is full of DNA—the instruction manual of life—and the scientists ... Read More

Finches

Finches

"Classic finches" are small to moderately large and have a strong beak, usually conical and in some species very large. All have 12 tail feathers and 9 primaries. Their nests are basket-shap... Read More

Ants on Stilts

Ants on Stilts

If you want to know how far you've walked, you can choose among several strategies. You can measure your route on a map. You can wear a handy gadget, such as a GPS device that calculates distances or ... Read More

Tuna

Tuna

Tuna, sometimes called tunafish, are several species of ocean-dwelling fish in the family Scombridae, mostly in the genus Thunnus. Tuna is an important commercial fish.... Read More

Yaks

Yaks

The yak (Bos grunniens) is a long-haired humped domestic bovine found in Tibet and throughout the Himalayan region of south central Asia, as well as in Mongolia. In Tibetan, the word yak refers only t... Read More









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