Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Seeds of the Future
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Toads
Animals
Roach Love Songs
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Behavior
Making light of sleep
How Much Babies Know
Reading Body Language
Birds
Mockingbirds
Vultures
Rheas
Chemistry and Materials
The newest superheavy in town
Makeup Science
Moon Crash, Splash
Computers
Look into My Eyes
A Classroom of the Mind
Middle school science adventures
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Feathered Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
A Living Fossil
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Environment
Saving Wetlands
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fakes in the museum
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Lungfish
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
The Color of Health
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Math of the World
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Spit Power
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Centipedes
Crustaceans
Mammals
Miscellaneous Mammals
Grizzly Bear
Golden Retrievers
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Road Bumps
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Springing forward
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Boa Constrictors
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
An Earthlike Planet
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Beyond Bar Codes
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Warmest Year on Record
Where rivers run uphill
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Sweet, Sticky ScienceSweet, Sticky Science - Sweet, Sticky Science

Sweet, Sticky Science

Real maple syrup sweetens even the dullest breakfast, and it's no mystery why. The sticky stuff you pour on your pancakes is at least two-thirds sugar. Read More



Great White Shark

Great Whites have a sixth sense given by the Ampullae of Lorenzini, which enables them to detect the electromagnetic field emitted by the movement of living animals. A Great White's sense of sight is useful, but the shark does not depend on it. Read More

Food Web Woes

Sharks are scary—no doubt about it. Just ask anyone who's seen Jaws or other films that feature these sharp-toothed creatures. But there's something that might be just as scary as meeting up with a shark—at least from an environmental perspective. Read More

Gray Whale

The Gray whale or Grey whale , more recently called the Eastern Pacific Gray whale, is a whale that travels between feeding and breeding grounds yearly. Gray whales were once called devil fish because of their fighting behavior when hunted. Read More

Pondering the puzzling platypus

The first European scientist who saw a platypus thought it was a fake. In the late 18th century, British scientist George Shaw received a package from the governor of Australia. Shaw found strange things when he opened the box. He found a preserved pelt Read More

Owls

An owl is a member of any of 222 currently known species of solitary, mainly nocturnal birds of prey in the order Strigiformes. Owls mostly hunt small mammals, insects, and other birds, though a few species specialize in hunting fish. Read More

Dark Galaxy

The Milky Way is packed with stars, comets, asteroids, moons, and planets, including our own. Other galaxies in the universe are similarly crammed full of stars and various objects. Astronomers have now spied something very unusual. Read More

A Wild Ferret Rise

Black-footed ferrets used to be in big trouble. The furry long-necked creatures look like a cross between a raccoon and a weasel, and they are North America's only native ferret species. By the late 1970s, however, scientists thought black-footed ferrets Read More

Swine flu goes global

If you live in the United States, it’s likely that swine flu has been found in your state. As of May 5, 403 people in 38 states have been diagnosed with novel influenza A (H1N1), commonly known as the Swine flu. Those numbers are likely to increase, acc Read More

Hair Detectives

You can tell a lot about people by looking at their hair—and not just whether they brush, spray, or blow-dry. Scientists have found a way to use hair to figure out where a person is from and where that person has been. The finding could help solve crimes Read More

Asteroid Moons

Three's company? In the realm of asteroids, that's something new. For the first time, astronomers have found an asteroid with more than one moon. Read More

Plants Travel Wind Highways

Gusts of wind can knock you over if they blow hard enough. If you were a plant, though, the wind could carry you or your spores for thousands of kilometers. Read More

Gut Germs to the Rescue

Germs can also be good for you, researchers are discovering. Between 500 and 1,000 different kinds of microbes live in a person's intestines. There are, in fact, more bacteria in your gut than cells in your entire body. Read More

Fastest Plant on Earth

Move over, Venus flytrap. Now, there's something faster. Using a high-speed camera, researchers have documented what may be the quickest-acting plant ever seen: the bunchberry dogwood slinging pollen into the air. Read More

Alien Invasions

Around the world, plants, animals, fungi, and other life forms are moving into places where they don't belong. These raids can mean major headaches for both wildlife and people. Read More

Macaws

Macaws are large colorful New World parrots, classified into six of the many Psittacidae genera: Ara, Anodorhynchus, Cyanopsitta, Propyrrhura, Orthopsittaca, and Diopsittaca. They are the largest birds in the parrot family in length and wingspan. Read More

Atomic Drive

Trucks, tractors, and bulldozers are impressive machines. They can rip into the earth or carry tons of gear. Large vans line the streets of many neighborhoods in the United States. Meanwhile, everyday automobiles seem to be getting bigger and bigger. A n Read More

Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, and chirps. Read More

Project Music

Music can make or break a party. It can also improve your health, your driving, and your math and physics skills, according to some of the projects at this year's Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Read More

Emus

The Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) is the largest bird native to Australia, and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius. The Emu is the second-largest flightless bird in the world, after its ratite relative the Ostrich. Read More

Message in a dinosaur's teeth

Spinosaurs were large, meat-eating dinosaurs whose fossilized remains are often found in the same areas as the bones of tyrannosaurs (such as Tyrannosaurus rex). Fans of the movie Jurassic Park III may remember the spinosaur as the cranky dinosaur — the o Read More

A Tongue and a Half

If there were a prize for animal rudeness, a small South American bat would surely be in the running. The creature doesn't just stick out its tongue. It shoots it way, way out. In fact, its tongue is longer than its body. At 1.5 times the animal's body l Read More

Poor Devils

The real Tasmanian devil doesn't look much like the familiar snarling and whirling cartoon character known as Taz, but it's every bit as fierce. When European settlers arrived on the Australian island of Tasmania and met the small marsupial, they called Read More

Have shell, will travel

Many modern animals, like crabs, live in shells and carry their homes around with them. Picture one of these animals in your mind, and you may have some idea of what the first land-dwelling animals looked like. After studying strange marks that accompany Read More

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Color-Changing Bugs

Color-Changing Bugs

A variety of animals can dramatically change the colors of their bodies to blend with the environment or to ward off predators, among other reasons. Such creatures, including chameleons and squid, us... Read More

Persian Cats

Persian Cats

The Persian cat is one of the oldest breeds of cat. A show-quality Persian has an extremely long thick coat, short legs, a wide head with the ears set far apart, large eyes, and an extremely foreshort... Read More

Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes

Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes

Cookies, soda, candy, chocolate: It can be hard to resist the temptation of sugary-sweet treats and drinks. But sugar is high in calories, and eating too much of it can cause weight gain and other he... Read More

Great Danes

Great Danes

The Great Dane is a breed of dog known for its large size and gentle personality. The breed is commonly referred to as the "Gentle Giant". ... Read More

Salamanders

Salamanders

Salamander is the common name applied to approximately 500 amphibian vertebrates with slender bodies, short legs, and long tails. Salamanders superficially resemble lizards, but are easily distinguish... Read More

Wombats

Wombats

Wombats dig extensive burrow systems with rodent-like front teeth and powerful claws. Although mainly crepuscular and nocturnal, wombats will also venture out to feed on cool or overcast days. They ar... Read More

Hermit Crabs

Hermit Crabs

Hermit crabs are crustaceans but, despite the name, distinct from true crab species. Most hermit crabs salvage empty seashells to shelter and protect their soft abdomens. There are about five hundred ... Read More

Packing Fat

Packing Fat

In developed parts of the world, from Australia to Europe to the United States, waistlines are bulging. People weigh more than ever before. Even children are joining the ranks of the obese in record n... Read More

Tuna

Tuna

Tuna, sometimes called tunafish, are several species of ocean-dwelling fish in the family Scombridae, mostly in the genus Thunnus. Tuna is an important commercial fish.... Read More

Hamsters

Hamsters

A hamster is a rodent belonging to subfamily Cricetinae. The subfamily contains about 18 species, classified in six or seven genera. Most have expandable cheek pouches, which reach from their cheeks t... Read More

Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice

Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice

Fish is good for you. But if you can't stand eating fish, you might still be in luck. Thanks to some crafty genetic engineering, omelets, hamburgers, and other foods of the future could have some of t... Read More

Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal

Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal

Although their name literally means "thousand legs," most millipedes have no more than 300 legs. The record holder is a millipede named Illacme plenipes, which has nearly 750 legs. It's the ... Read More

Taking the sting out of scorpion venom

Taking the sting out of scorpion venom

About as long as a human finger, the Arizona bark scorpion is small enough that most people probably don’t even notice it. Unless they happen to step on one — and that’s a different story. ... Read More

The science of disappearing

The science of disappearing

For inspiration, you could hit the books: In Greek mythology, the goddess Athena wore an invisibility cap during the Trojan War. The same cap helped the half-god Perseus, who wore it to hide from Medu... Read More

Mice sense each other's fear

Mice sense each other's fear

You can usually tell when people are afraid just by the look on their faces. Mice can tell when other mice are afraid too. But instead of using their beady little eyes to detect fear in their fellows,... Read More









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