Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Springing forward
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Newts
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Putting a Mouse on Pause
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Behavior
Wired for Math
Homework blues
The case of the headless ant
Birds
Dodos
Penguins
Quails
Chemistry and Materials
The science of disappearing
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Pencil Thin
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The Book of Life
New eyes to scan the skies
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
An Ancient Spider's Web
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
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Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Pollution Detective
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
The Taming of the Cat
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Salmon
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Sturgeons
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Healing Honey
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Deep-space dancers
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Germ Zapper
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Ants
Dragonflies
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Walrus
Scottish Folds
Moles
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Black Hole Journey
One ring around them all
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Crocodilians
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Catching a Comet's Tail
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Crime Lab
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Robots on a Rocky Road
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Watering the Air
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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Blue BearBlue Bear - Blue Bear

Blue Bear

The Tibetan Blue Bear (Ursus arctos pruinosus) is a subspecies of the Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) found in the eastern Tibetan plateau. It is also known as the Tibetan Brown Bear, or the Horse Bear. In Tibetan it is known as Dom gyamuk. Read More



Sea Lilies on the Run

Some animals are famous for their ability to run. Cheetahs, the fastest of all land animals, can reach speeds of 70 miles per hour. Antelope bound over hills and prairies to elude predators. Human sprinters win medals for their skill. Other animals are k Read More

Mother-of-Pearl on Ice

Pearls are some of the more beautiful examples of nature's strength. The gemstones grow inside oysters, and they are remarkably sturdy and tough. Now, scientists have found a way to copy what oysters have been doing all along. They've made a pearl-like m Read More

Holes in Martian moon mystery

The Martian moon Phobos is cratered, lumpy and about 16.8 miles long, or 3 miles longer than the island of Manhattan. According to a recent study, the moon is also unusually light. Read More

Sticking Around with Gecko Tape

In the movie Spider-Man, actor Tobey Maguire makes climbing up walls and hanging out on the ceiling look easy—thanks to special effects. In future movies, though, actors and stunt doubles might really be able to crawl along walls and ceilings. All they'll Read More

Crows

True crows are large passerine birds in the genus Corvus. All temperate continents (except South America) and several offshore and oceanic islands (including Hawaii) have 40 or so members of this genus. Read More

Flying Foxes

Bats of the genus Pteropus, belonging to the Megachiroptera sub-order, are the largest bats in the world. They are commonly known as the Fruit bat, Flying fox or Malayan Flyingfox among other numerous colloquial names. Read More

Challenging the Forces of Nature

A tsunami is approaching the beach. Time is running out. In just 20 minutes, it'll be all over. "We should start focusing on how to prevent the tsunami," says 14-year-old Anudeep Gosal of Orlando, Fla. His teammates, all 12-to-14-year-olds, are drawing o Read More

Dodos

The Mauritius Dodo (Raphus cucullatus, called Didus ineptus by Linnaeus), more commonly just Dodo, was a metre-high flightless bird of the island of Mauritius. The Dodo, which is currently extinct, lived on fruit and nested on the ground. Read More

Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head

Any time you go outside, you get pummeled by invisible storms of dust. Even on a perfectly sunny day, you inhale pieces of dead bugs. Floating specks of hair and pollen settle on your skin. Tiny chunks of comets might even fall on your head from outer spa Read More

Food for Life

A hamburger or a salad? A baked potato or French fries? A milkshake or orange juice? A candy bar or an apple? We have to make choices about what we eat every day. Read More

Asteroid Lost and Found

Everybody loses things: Socks in the laundry. Sunglasses. Phone numbers written on little scraps of paper. You may have even lost your homework once or twice. But can you imagine losing an entire asteroid? Read More

Small but WISE

Anyone on Earth can look up and see the moon or stars, but it takes a telescope to get a glimpse of planets and the other bright and strange things that share our universe. Astronomers are always finding new ways to observe far-off galaxies and study the Read More

The Down Side of Keeping Clean

Wash your hands. Brush your teeth. Scrub the toilet. Do the dishes. Being clean is supposed to keep us healthy by destroying bacteria that make us sick. Read More

Electric Catfish

Electric catfish (family Malapteruridae) is the common name of several species of freshwater catfish with the ability to produce an electric shock of up to 350 volts using electroplaques of an electric organ. Read More

GSAT stars reap scholarship glory By Nadisha Hunter, Gleaner Writer

Thirty-three students who churned out remarkable scores in this year's Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) have reaped the benefits with government scholarships. Read More

Storks

Storks are large, long-legged, long-necked wading birds with long stout bills, belonging to the family Ciconiidae. They occur in most of the warmer regions of the world and tend to live in drier habitats than the related herons, spoonbills and ibises Read More

Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants

Birds are famous for carrying things from place to place. Some, like homing pigeons, can be trained to deliver messages and packages. Other birds unknowingly carry pollen, burrs, and seeds that latch on for the ride. Read More

Pigeons

The large bird genus Columba comprises a group of medium to large stout-bodied pigeons, often referred to as the typical pigeons. As with other genera in the family, the terms dove and pigeon are used interchangeably. Read More

Giving Sharks Safe Homes

Being surrounded by sharks may sound like a bad thing, but scientists say sharks are actually a good sign of ocean health. Even knowing that, Enric Sala, a marine ecologist and National Geographic Fellow, was a little nervous when he first dived at Kingma Read More

Pencil Thin

Imagine a shaving of pencil lead, the kind that might fall on your desk after you use a hand-held sharpener. Now try to imagine a pencil flake that's only one atom thick—less than 1-millionth the thickness of the shaving! Scientists have created just suc Read More

A Dead Star's Dusty Ring

In 5 billion years, the sun will swell into a huge ball that will fry Earth or even swallow it up. Our star's outer layers will then fly off, and its core will shrink into a dense, fading object called a white dwarf. Read More

Asp

Vipera aspis is a moderate-sized snake, growing to an adult length of between 70 to 90 centimeters, with a relatively thick body. Males are normally larger than females. The snake is distinguished by its broad triangular head. Read More

Surviving Olympic Heat

It's going to be hot over there. At this summer's Olympic Games in Athens, temperatures will soar into the 90s. The air will be humid, sticky, and laden with pollution. It'll be hard to breathe, hard to stay cool, hard to keep hydrated. Read More

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Garter Snakes

Garter Snakes

Garter snakes are extremely common across North America, from Canada to Central America, and an everyday find in gardens. They are the single most widely distributed species of reptile in North Americ... Read More

Mako Sharks

Mako Sharks

Shortfin makos are renowned for their speed and their ability to leap out of the water. The name "mako" comes from the Ma-ori language for blue lightning, reflecting its colour and speed. ... Read More

Wildcats

Wildcats

The wildcat Felis silvestris, sometimes "wildcat" or "wild-cat" especially when distinguishing from other wild species of felines, is a small predator native to Europe, the western... Read More

Birds We Eat

Birds We Eat

Birds have always been an important food source for man. In addition to domestic species that provide us with eggs, there are still other species that are hunted in the wild for sport and for food. So... Read More

Slumber by the numbers

Slumber by the numbers

It’s an important question: “On an average school night, how many hours of sleep do you get?” More than 12,000 high school students were recently asked that during a survey by the Centers for Disease... Read More

Little People Cause Big Surprise

Little People Cause Big Surprise

There are little people, and then there are little people. Between 38,000 and 18,000 years ago, there lived an especially tiny group of people-like beings. ... Read More

 Children and Media

Children and Media

Find information about what media milestones to expect from your child and what you can do to further his knowledge of media tools.... Read More

Raccoons

Raccoons

Raccoons are mammals in the genus Procyon of the Procyonidae family. Raccoons are unusual for their thumbs, which (though not opposable) enable them to open many closed containers and doors.... Read More

A Smashing Display

A Smashing Display

Fireworks thrilled viewers all over the United States on the Fourth of July. An even bigger display took place deep in outer space on the same day. ... Read More

Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze

Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze

At first, it may seem like a treat to stay up late—but the next day will be no picnic. There'll be yawning, heavy limbs, and a cranky disposition. At times like these, the desire to sleep can feel ov... Read More

Have shell, will travel

Have shell, will travel

Many modern animals, like crabs, live in shells and carry their homes around with them. Picture one of these animals in your mind, and you may have some idea of what the first land-dwelling animals lo... Read More

Miscellaneous Mammals

Miscellaneous Mammals

Mammals are identified by a combination of warm blood, body fur or hair, and glands that produce milk to feed their young; beyond these few common traits, however, mammals are wildly diverse in shape,... Read More

Weasels

Weasels

Weasels are mammals in the genus Mustela of the Mustelidae family. Originally, the name "weasel" was applied to one species of the genus, the European form of the Least Weasel. ... Read More

Supergoo to the rescue

Supergoo to the rescue

Inside a disposable diaper are tiny crystals of a material called sodium polyacrylate that can absorb hundreds of times their weight in water. Just a small amount of the stuff — sometimes called “Supe... Read More

A Volcano's Deadly Ash

A Volcano's Deadly Ash

Every few hundred years, a sleeping giant in southern Italy awakens with a bang, spewing volcanic ash across the countryside. The volcano, called Mount Vesuvius, formed 25,000 years ago. During its m... Read More









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