Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Springing forward
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Vampire Bats on the Run
Fishy Cleaners
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Behavior
Lightening Your Mood
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Birds
Geese
Carnivorous Birds
Pigeons
Chemistry and Materials
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Lighting goes digital
When frog gender flips
Computers
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Getting in Touch with Touch
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Watering the Air
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Warmest Year on Record
Environment
A Change in Time
Alien Invasions
Saving Wetlands
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Halibut
Seahorses
Carp
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Chew for Health
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Play for Science
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Disease Detectives
Invertebrates
Termites
Roundworms
Insects
Mammals
Blue Whales
Chihuahuas
Guinea Pigs
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Physics
IceCube Science
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Electric Backpack
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Geckos
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Ringing Saturn
Planning for Mars
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Searching for Alien Life
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Revving Up Green Machines
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Arctic Melt
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Dinosaurs Grow UpDinosaurs Grow Up - Dinosaurs Grow Up

Dinosaurs Grow Up

One day, you realize that you can reach a shelf you could never get to before. Pretty soon, you're buying new clothes every few months because the old ones are too short or too tight. Before you know it, you can stare directly into the eyes of your teache Read More



Macaws

Macaws are large colorful New World parrots, classified into six of the many Psittacidae genera: Ara, Anodorhynchus, Cyanopsitta, Propyrrhura, Orthopsittaca, and Diopsittaca. They are the largest birds in the parrot family in length and wingspan. Read More

A Planet from the Early Universe

If you thought your parents were old, get this. Astronomers have discovered the oldest and most distant planet known in the universe. The planet is so far away that it takes light 7,200 years to get here from there. Read More

How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam By Ministry Of Education

The GSAT Placement Mechanism The Ministry recognizes that placement of GSAT students is one of the main areas of concern and anxiety among parents. It is with this in mind that this paper seeks to shed some light on the process of placement. Read More

What is a Preposition?

A preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. The word or phrase that the preposition introduces is called the object of the preposition. A preposition usually indicates the temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its Read More

Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales

Walk along a wild, rocky stretch of the Washington State coast and you might catch a glimpse of a furry creature bobbing on its back in the waves. The basking animal is likely to be a sea otter. Read More

A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?

Before the invention of central heating and hot cocoa, it would have been too cold for people to migrate to North America through the frigid tundra—without trees or firewood. Or so scientists thought. Read More

Hearing Whales

Ears are for hearing—everyone knows that. But for a creature called the Cuvier's beaked whale, hearing starts in the throat, a new study finds. The observation might help explain how all whales hear, researchers say. The work might also help scientists u Read More

Cell Phone Tattlers

Your cell phone holds secrets about you. Besides the names and numbers that you've programmed into it, traces of your DNA linger on the device, according to a new study. Read More

When frog gender flips

Several months ago, a California college student working at a university laboratory checked up on a group of frogs and saw some unusual behavior. Some of the frogs were acting like females — which was unusual, since at the beginning of the experiment all Read More

Chocolate Rules

For a lot of people, there's no better taste combo than chocolate and nuts. For food scientists, though, this combination is a major headache. Read More

Cool as a Jupiter

Astronomers have found more than 400 planets outside the solar system. These distant worlds are full of surprises: Some are giant and made of gas, like Jupiter, and others seem to be rocky, like big versions of Earth. Read More

Woolly Mammoths

A mammoth is any of a number of an extinct genus of elephant, often with long curved tusks and, in northern species, a covering of long hair. They lived during the Pleistocene epoch from 1.6 million years ago to around 3,500 years ago. Read More

Robots on a Rocky Road

Here's the challenge. Design a vehicle that can travel 142 miles across the desert between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. Your invention will have to stop at a number of checkpoints along the way, and it'll be racing more than a dozen other vehicles. Read More

Electric Catfish

Electric catfish (family Malapteruridae) is the common name of several species of freshwater catfish with the ability to produce an electric shock of up to 350 volts using electroplaques of an electric organ. Read More

Science loses out when ice caps melt

t’s hard to imagine a mountain range without snow-covered peaks. But that may soon be the case in countries in or near the tropics. Studies show that the ice that sits atop the world’s highest mountains is vanishing at an alarming rate, threatening to lea Read More

Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. Read More

Watering the Air

The average temperature around the world is rising. People living in the U.S. Midwest might find this fact hard to believe, though. Two new studies show that in America’s heartland, summers are now cooler and wetter than they were in years past. The scien Read More

Feathered Fossils

As dinosaurs go, Velociraptor mongoliensis is fairly famous. Three starred in the 1993 film Jurassic Park. Despite the creature's fame, scientists have found remains from only about 20 velociraptors. Most of those discoveries turned up in the last 15 yea Read More

Memory by Hypnosis

Hypnosis can seem like magic. When in this dreamlike state, people are easily convinced to do things they wouldn't normally do. Now, scientists have used hypnosis to study the mind's amazing and mysterious ability to focus on certain memories (such as th Read More

An Ocean View's Downside

Going to the beach, swimming in the ocean, and surfing or just watching the waves are part of many vacations. For the increasing number of people who move to coastal areas, such activities become part of everyday life. Read More

The Incredible Shrunken Kids

The smallest kids on Earth are much smaller than you or your baby brother or sister. They're smaller than a flea. They're even smaller than the hairs on a flea's leg. These tiny tykes are so small, in fact, that 20 billion billion of them can fit into a j Read More

Project Music

Music can make or break a party. It can also improve your health, your driving, and your math and physics skills, according to some of the projects at this year's Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Read More

A Change in Time

If you don't know what time it is, you can probably find out very quickly. Clocks and watches show the time, of course. And so do computers, cell phones, microwave ovens, VCRs, radios, and other devices in our everyday lives. Read More

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Fishy Sounds

Fishy Sounds

Although coral reefs look peaceful, they're noisy places. Shrimp make popping noises that sound like bacon frying in a pan. Fish click their jaws or make rumbling sounds as they swim around. Such a l... Read More

Flamingos

Flamingos

Flamingos are gregarious wading birds in the genus Phoenicopterus and family Phoenicopteridae. They are found in both the Western and Eastern Hemispheres, but are more numerous in the latter. ... Read More

Snowflakes and Avalanches

Snowflakes and Avalanches

High on a mountainside, ski patroller Karl Birkeland dug a pit into a drift to check the snow's stability. He declared the slope safe for skiing. The danger of an avalanche appeared low. It was 1985,... Read More

Flower family knows its roots

Flower family knows its roots

Jewelweeds, or Impatiens, are pretty flowers that grow in wet, shady spots all over the Northern Hemisphere. According to a recent experiment, they seem to know their own flower family. The experimen... Read More

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Scientists searching for an Earth-friendly alternative to gasoline are looking in some of the weirdest places—termite guts, cow stomachs, and rotting logs. These researchers are hunting for bacteria a... Read More

New Gene Fights Potato Blight

New Gene Fights Potato Blight

If you're like most people, the biggest potato crisis you ever face is the common lunchtime question: "Do you want fries or chips with that?" Potato farmers have much bigger worries. A seri... Read More

Making light of sleep

Making light of sleep

Maybe this has happened to you: In the middle of class, while you pretended to be paying attention to the teacher’s lecture, your eyelids started to droop. You began having second thoughts about stayi... Read More

Aardvarks

Aardvarks

The Aardvark (Orycteropus afer) is a medium-sized mammal native to Africa. The name comes from the Afrikaans/Dutch for "earth pig" (aarde earth, varken pig), because early settlers from Euro... Read More

Tropical Birds

Tropical Birds

While local wild birds offer their own uniqe birdwatching experience, tropical climates and rainforest environments seem to attract the most vibrantly colored and exotic of bird species; from rainbow ... Read More

Speedy stars

Speedy stars

Think stars don’t move? Think again! When you look into the sky at night, the stars may appear to stay in place. But stars are always on the move — they’re just so far away that the motion is hard to ... Read More

Lampreys

Lampreys

A lamprey is a jawless fish with a toothed, funnel-like sucking mouth, with which most species bore into fish flesh to suck their blood. In zoology, lampreys are not considered to be true fish because... Read More

Revenge of the Cowbirds

Revenge of the Cowbirds

Cowbirds are famous for their wily ways. These North American birds sneak into the nests of other birds, lay their eggs, and quickly escape before the owners return. They don't do any of the hard wor... Read More

Emus

Emus

The Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) is the largest bird native to Australia, and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius. The Emu is the second-largest flightless bird in the world, after its rati... Read More

Where rivers run uphill

Where rivers run uphill

Scientists think that lakes under the ice might act like giant slippery banana peels — helping the ice slide more quickly over Antarctica’s bumpy bedrock toward the ocean, where it breaks into iceberg... Read More

Narwhals

Narwhals

The Narwhal (Monodon monoceros) is an Arctic species of cetacean with a body similar to that of a Beluga whale and Irrawaddy dolphin. It is rare creature found south of latitude 70°N. It is one of two... Read More









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