Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Watering the Air
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Gliders in the Family
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Behavior
The Electric Brain
How Much Babies Know
Face values
Birds
Hummingbirds
Cardinals
Owls
Chemistry and Materials
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Heaviest named element is official
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
Programming with Alice
Galaxies on the go
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
A Living Fossil
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Environment
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
A Change in Climate
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Barracudas
Skates and Rays
Trout
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Recipe for Health
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Detecting True Art
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Sun Screen
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Gut Microbes and Weight
Invertebrates
Giant Squid
Crabs
Tapeworms
Mammals
Cougars
Rodents
Pekingese
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
One ring around them all
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Seeds of the Future
Stalking Plants by Scent
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Alligators
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
A Great Ball of Fire
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Ready, unplug, drive
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Change in Climate
Catching Some Rays
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A Sense of DangerA Sense of Danger - A Sense of Danger

A Sense of Danger

Animals do amazing things. Birds migrate immense distances. Whales communicate across vast oceans. Honeybees remember familiar flowers. Crows can turn sticks into tools. Dogs sense when their owners are coming home. Elephants can imitate sounds. Mon Read More



Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010 By KINGSTON (JIS)

The Ministry of Education revealed Tuesday (July 6) that 82 scholarships, including 33 Government scholarships, have been awarded to successful 2010 GSAT students from primary, all-age, junior high and preparatory schools, islandwide. Read More

Doberman Pinschers

The Doberman or Doberman Pinscher is a breed of domestic dog. Dobermans are commonly used as guard dogs, watch dogs, or police dogs. Dobermanns are one of the most recognizable breeds, both because of their actual roles in society and stereotyping. Read More

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

In English grammar, words that refer to people, places, or things are called nouns. They can be classified in many ways. One way to classify nouns is according to whether they can be counted or not. Many English mistakes are related to this point. Read More

Spotty Survival

Northern spotted owls live in the western parts of northern California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. They roost in stands of trees that are hundreds of years old. Read More

Atomic Drive

Trucks, tractors, and bulldozers are impressive machines. They can rip into the earth or carry tons of gear. Large vans line the streets of many neighborhoods in the United States. Meanwhile, everyday automobiles seem to be getting bigger and bigger. A n Read More

No Fat Stars

There's a limit to how big most things can get. Some people are really tall, but no one is as tall as a house. Cats can get really fat, but there's never been a tabby as heavy as a truck. And so on. Read More

A Sour Taste in Your Mouth

Think of all the amazing things that your tongue does for you. Specialized cells on your tongue, for example, give you the power to enjoy (and gag at) the spices and other flavors of the world's cuisines. Read More

Small but WISE

Anyone on Earth can look up and see the moon or stars, but it takes a telescope to get a glimpse of planets and the other bright and strange things that share our universe. Astronomers are always finding new ways to observe far-off galaxies and study the Read More

Elk

The elk (Cervus elaphus) are the second largest species of deer in the world, after Alces alces (the moose or, in Europe, elk). Elk are found in nearly every country in Europe. Read More

A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps

Most parents would never consider putting a baby in a crib full of bees. Some wasp moms, however, do just that. It may sound like child abuse to you. Strangely enough, for the wasps known as beewolves, the behavior actually helps their young survive. But Read More

Moths

A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. Both are of the order Lepidoptera. Most species of moths are nocturnal, but there are crepuscular (twilight-dwelling) and diurnal (day-dwelling) species. Read More

Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice

Fish is good for you. But if you can't stand eating fish, you might still be in luck. Thanks to some crafty genetic engineering, omelets, hamburgers, and other foods of the future could have some of the health benefits of fish, without smelling. Read More

African Hippopotamus

The Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius also known as river-horse) is a large, plant-eating African mammal, one of only two extant, and three or four recently extinct, species in the family Hippopotamidae. Read More

A Global Warming Flap

Florian Altermatt likes to chase butterflies, but he’s also a scientist who thinks that butterflies might have something to tell us about the effects of global warming. Altermatt is an ecologist — a scientist who studies how creatures interact with their Read More

Pumping Up Poison Ivy

It itches and oozes. With its red bumps, a poison ivy rash can make you miserable. A new study suggests that rising levels of the gas carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could make poison ivy grow faster and become more toxic. Read More

Meet the new dinos

The last dinosaurs died about 65 million years ago, long before humans started walking around. Scientists can still learn new things about these ancient animals though, thanks to the fossils they left behind. Paleontologists are scientists who study dinos Read More

Spinning Clay into Cotton

You're probably not allowed to wear your pajamas when you play in the dirt. Someday, though, the clothes you wear to bed may be made partly out of clay. Before you go to bed tonight, read the label in your pajamas. Chances are, you'll find that they're no Read More

Settling the Americas

The world was a very different place tens of thousands of years ago. People didn't yet inhabit many regions that are crowded today. Read More

Dreams of Floating in Space

On Feb. 1, just minutes before it was scheduled to land, the space shuttle Columbia tore apart, killing all seven of its crew. Read More

Homework blues

Homework can put you in a bad mood, and that might actually be a good thing. New research suggests that, in some cases, being too happy can hurt your performance on certain kinds of tasks. Researchers from the University of Plymouth in England wondered w Read More

The metal detector in your mouth

When you taste lemons, you know it because they’re sour. Sugar tastes sweet. Salt tastes, well…salty. Tastes buds on the surface of your tongue help you identify food that you’ve put into your mouth. Until recently, scientists believed there were only a f Read More

Salt and Early Civilization

Before salted fries came out of drive-through windows, before salty pretzels sat on the shelves of every grocery store, before there was a saltshaker on every dinner table, people had to go to a lot of trouble to get salt. Read More

Basking Sharks

The Basking Shark (Cetorhinus maximus), also known as the Bone Shark, is the second largest fish alive, after the Whale Shark. A cosmopolitan species, Basking Sharks are found in all the world's temperate oceans. Read More

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Sharks

Sharks

Like other fish, sharks have scales, although theirs are smaller and coarser (so a shark's skin feels like sandpaper). Although often portrayed as vicious killers, sharks will normally leave humans al... Read More

Sticky Silky Feet

Sticky Silky Feet

Comic book superhero Spider-Man uses tiny hairs on his fingertips to climb up walls. But he could have had another secret weapon to help him stick. Scientists have now found that some spiders can als... Read More

Walking Sticks

Walking Sticks

Phasmids (or Walking Sticks as they are commonly called) are one of the most remarkable orders of insects. They are typically either stick-like or leaf-like; camouflage or mimicry being their defining... Read More

Babies Prove Sound Learners

Babies Prove Sound Learners

It can be hard to know what newborns want. They can't talk, walk, or even point at what they're thinking about. Yet babies begin to develop language skills long before they begin speaking, according ... Read More

Kingfishers

Kingfishers

Kingfishers are birds of the three tismand Alcedinidae (river kingfishers), Halcyonidae (tree kingfishers), and Cerylidae (water kingfishers). There are about 90 species of kingfisher. All have large ... Read More

Order of Adjectives

Order of Adjectives By Teach It To Kids

The ORDER of adjectives is quite important in English. There is an order of adjectives that native speakers of English normally follow.... Read More

Slip Sliming Away

Slip Sliming Away

Slugs and snails produce slime that looks a lot like the stuff that comes out of your nose. These creatures don't use tissues to wipe up their snot, though. Instead, they use the goo to help them stic... Read More

Spin, Splat, and Scramble

Spin, Splat, and Scramble

Having fun? Take a break and give this some thought: Science can help you play better. ... Read More

Perches

Perches

Perch are a group of freshwater fish belonging to the family Percidae. Perch have "rough" or ctenoid scales. When looking through a microscope, the scales look like plates with growth rings ... Read More

Math Naturals

Math Naturals

t's probably an exaggeration to say that kids are natural math geniuses. But kindergartners can solve math problems with large numbers long before they officially learn how to add and subtract. By usi... Read More

Armadillo

Armadillo

Armadillos are small placental mammals of the family Dasypodidae, mostly known for having a bony armor shell. All species are native to the Americas, where they inhabit a variety of environments. ... Read More

Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater

Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater

Mermaids probably don't exist. But there are children of certain tribes in Asia who are distinctly fishlike. ... Read More

A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales

A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales

In 1989, an oil tanker called the Exxon Valdez struck an underwater reef in Prince William Sound, a large body of water in southern Alaska. The ship dumped about 11 million gallons of crude oil into t... Read More

A Pepper Part that Burns Fat

A Pepper Part that Burns Fat

Diet fads come and go, but in the end, there’s really only one rule for losing weight: Burn more energy than you consume. In April, scientists from California reported on a chemical that might help pe... Read More

Burst Busters

Burst Busters

Explosions on Earth are a pretty big deal. In outer space, though, things are blowing up all the time. Two new studies show that a particularly powerful type of explosion is 10 times as common, but no... Read More









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